3.03.2015

Kalamata Olive and Rosemary Fougasse with Fresh Herb and Pepper Dipping Oil


What do you think about a a simple way to may fougasse?  What is fougasse?  It's basically a French version of Italian focaccia bread.  The flat bread can be slashed to form shapes and topped with an herb topping.  

If I can make focaccia out of the "no knead" dough recipe, why not use the same technique to make fougasse?  It's easy.  It doesn't have a lot of prep time and it will blow the socks off your fam. 



Instead of topping the fougasse with herbs, I put some fresh rosemary in the dough.  I made a completely addicting olive oil dip with fresh herbs and red pepper flakes.  


If you are big into dipping, you may want to double the batch.



You will need:

3 3/4 cup flour
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon yeast
1 tablespoons fresh rosemary
1/2 cup chopped Kalamata olives
1 1/2 cups water


I'm using my mixer, because the dough is a bit stiffer and I want to make sure I get all of the flour mixed in well so I don't have any dry spots.  This can definitely be mixed by hand.  Tonight I'm lazy.

In my mixer bowl I have just added 3 3/4 cup flour and 2 teaspoons of sea salt.


Add 1/4 teaspoon of yeast.

I realize this doesn't seem like much, but the dough is going to rise for 18 hours and I don't want a strong yeast flavor over powering my fougasse.


Add 1 tablespoons fresh rosemary, chopped.


Add 1/2 cup finely chopped kalamata olives.


Using the paddle attachment, mix all the ingredients together.


Pour the water in all at once.  I used water straight from the tap.  It's cool to the touch.


Mix just until all of the ingredients are wet and there are no dry flour spots.


Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 18 hours.  Plan your timing accordingly.  I have let the dough sit for as long as 24 hours with no problems.

Don't touch the dough.  Don't refrigerate the dough.  Just ignore it for 18 hours.  Just walk away. Don't punch it down or mess with it.  Just let it sit.


After 18 hours the dough will have risen.


The dough isn't as sticky as the no knead bread dough, but I still heavily four my pastry cloth.

Dump the dough out onto any floured surface.


Sprinkle your hands and the top of the dough with flour.  DO NOT knead the dough.  DO NOT be tempted to knead the dough.  Just leave the air bubbles alone.


Divide the dough in half.


Using your fingers, gently press the dough into a 5 x 10-inch rectangle.


You can gently pull the dough if needed.  Just make sure your are gentle.


Place the rectangle on a baking sheet lined with parchment.


Using a pizza wheel slash a slit down the center of the rectangle one inch from the top down to one inch from the bottom.


Carefully pull the slash apart slightly.


This is pulled a little more than slightly.  I got a little carried away and exaggerated a bit for the camera.


Now make 3 slashes on an angle down each side of the dough.


Gently open the slashes to form holes.




I like to heavily brush the dough with a good flavored olive oil.


Lightly sprinkle with flaked sea salt.  I'm using Maldon Flaked Sea Salt.  Love this stuff.




Lightly cover with plastic wrap and let rise for a good hour.



Uncover and place in a preheated 425 degree F oven and bake for 25 minutes or until golden brown.



Pretty.

While the bread is rising I like to make the dipping oil.




For this amazing dipping oil you will need:

1/3 cup good quality olive oil
2 garlic cloves, chopped
2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, chopped
1/4 teaspoon sea salt, I used Pink Himalayan
1/4 teaspoon fresh coarsely ground pepper
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes


This could not be more simple.

Pour 1/3 cup olive oil in a shallow bowl.  Add 2 chopped garlic cloves.


2 teaspoons chopped fresh rosemary.


1/4 teaspoon sea salt.


1/4 teaspoon coarse fresh ground black pepper.


1/4 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes.


Stir.


Let stand while the dough is rising and the fougasse is baking.  This will allow for the flavors to blend.


No need to wait for the fougasse to cool.  Just rip off a piece, dip, enjoy.

That was easy!






Kalamata Olive and Rosemary Fougasse
3 3/4 cup flour
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 teaspoon yeast
1 tablespoons fresh rosemary
1/2 cup chopped Kalamata olives
1 1/2 cups water

In a large mixing bowl combine flour, salt, yeast, rosemary, olives.  Stir together.  Add water all at once.  Mix until the mixture is not longer dry.  Cover with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 18 hours undisturbed.

After 18 hours, place dough into a floured surface. DO NOT KNEAD THE DOUGH.  Divide dough in half.  Gently press each piece into a 5 x 10-inch rectangle. Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment.  Make a slash down the center of each rectangle starting one inch from the top down to one inch from the bottom.  Gently spread dough apart.  Make three slashes on an angle on each side of the dough.  Gently pull dough to create a hole.  Brush generously with olive oil.  Lightly sprinkle with flaked sea salt.  Lightly cover with plastic wrap and allow to rise for at least one hour.  Bake in a preheated 425 degree F oven for 25 minutes or until golden.  Makes 2 fougasse.


Fresh Herb and Pepper Dipping Oil
1/3 cup good quality olive oil
2 garlic cloves, chopped
2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, chopped
1/4 teaspoon sea salt, I used Pink Himalayan 
1/4 teaspoon fresh coarsely ground pepper 
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Combine all ingredients in a bowl.  Let stand at room temperature for about 20 minutes to allow flavors to blend.


15 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you. It's pretty fabulous.

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  2. Janet, that looks amazing! One question - what kind of yeast are you using?

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    Replies
    1. I always use Saf instant yeast. Rapid rise yeast will work as well.

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    2. Hi Janet darling, can you please tell me what your pastry cloth is made out of, I want to make one as we don't have them in Australia....your Fougasse looks amazing as all your recipes do, but I want to make my pastry cloth first then I can use it to make the Fougasse. Love your work xxxxxxxxxxxx Julie

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    3. Hi Julie, the pastry cloth is simply canvas. It's a light canvas. I have just purchased a yard from the fabric store, but it does shrink. Wash it a few times and serge the edges if you would like. You can find them on Amazon. I hope you can find one. I love mine. It's starting to fall apart because I use it so much.

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  3. I'm salivating here girl!

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  4. Thanks for the yeast info, Janet.

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  5. Boy that looks amazing! Thank you for sharing, xoRobin

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  6. I made this bread today using my Wild Alaskan Sourdough starter. Oh goodness is this bread good! I love it and will make this again. I shared it with my neighbors too. :)

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    Replies
    1. First question: Where did you get your Wild Alaskan Sourdough starter? Sounds amazing!
      Thank you for your positive comment. You made my day :) Lucky neighbors.

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  7. Question? From a newbie? I do the overnight no knead dough all the time. But I always find that I have to put more water than called for to get the dough to "grab" all the flour away from the sides of the bowl. This recipe calls for even MORE flour but the same amount of water. Is that a typo? Also, I am mixing by hand. No fancy KitchenAid here, sadly. :)

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    Replies
    1. No need for a kitchenaid...no pun intended. No typo is does have more flour. I just get my hands in the bowl and mix it up. Keep kneading it by hand for a minute or so until all of the flour seems to be mixed in. After the rise it should handle just great.

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