5.30.2014

Brioche Burger Buns




If you are serious about your burgers and you want THE best burger in town, this is the bun for you.  I have been extremely picky about my buns for years (hee hee).  I have driven 30 minutes to purchase the perfect hamburger bun.  Why go to so much work on the burger when the bun is mediocre from a grocery store 8-pack package?  








Last year my husband and I were in Roanoke, Virginia and had delicious burgers at Beamer's 25.  They serve their burgers on brioche buns.  A burger joint will serve their burgers on house made buns.  Why not?  It pushes the burger over the top.

After my burger in Virginia, I was determined to make my own buns.  They are easy and they are fabulous.  





To make the buns you will need:

1 (240 ml) cup warm water


3 tablespoons (45 ml) warm milk

2 teaspoons active dry yeast
2 1/2 tablespoons (15 gr) sugar
1 large egg
3 cups (360 gr) bread flour
1/3 cup (40 gr) all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup (55 gr) unsalted butter, softened





Pour the 3 tablespoons of warm milk into the 1 cup warm water.




Add 2 1/2 tablespoons sugar.




and 2 teaspoons of dry yeast.




Stir to dissolve the sugar and yeast.  Set aside.




Meanwhile, in the bowl of a food processor add 3 cups bread flour and 1/3 cup all-purpose flour.

I discovered that making dough in a food processor is super fast and makes a beautiful dough.




To the flour add 1 1/2 teaspoons salt.  

Pulse the flour ingredients together a few times to combine.





Cut up the 1/4 cup butter.




Add to the flour mixture.




Pulse several times until the flour mixture is like a sandy mixture.




Beat 1 egg.




Add to the flour mixture.




Place the lid on the processor and slowly pour in the water/yeast mixture with the machine running.




Keep the processor running until a smooth soft dough forms.

The entire process will probably take 3 minutes.  How awesome is that?




Butter a large bowl.




Remove dough from processor and form into a smooth ball of dough.




Place in butter bowl.




Cover with plastic wrap and let rise for 1-2 hours or until doubled in size.




This dough is so soft and nice you shouldn't need to place it on a floured board.  The dough is perfect to handle as is.




Remove dough from the bowl.




Cut dough into 8 equal portions.






If you're anal and want each bun to be the exact same size, you can weigh it.  I found that I can make eight 4-ounce buns.  




Shape the buns into a ball.




Then gently flatten to form a disk.




Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or lightly greased.  

I like to place them far apart because they will rise quite a bit.  No more than 6 to a baking sheet.




To glaze the buns you will need:

1 egg
1 tablespoon cold water
poppy seeds, sesame seeds, if desired




Whisk the egg and water together creating an egg wash.




Gently brush the dough with egg wash.  Make sure to brush around the sides.




Sprinkle with poppy seeds or sesame seeds, if you so choose.




Spray a piece of plastic wrap with nonstick spray and lightly cover the buns.   




Allow to rise for an additional 30-60 minutes.





You can tell if the dough is fully risen by gently pressing on the dough.  If it feels like a marshmallow, then it's ready to bake.




Place in a preheated 400 F (205C) degree oven.  




Bake for 15 minutes or until golden brown.  Remove from oven and allow to cool before storing.  

I have made them a week in advance then placed them in the freezer.  The buns will thaw perfectly.  Spread with a little butter and toast for the perfect bed for a burger.





This makes a large bun.  Dough can easily be divided into smaller rounds for smaller buns. Diving dough into 16 small pieces of dough makes a perfect slider bun.











 Brioche Burger Buns


1 (240 ml) cup warm water


3 tablespoons (45 ml) warm milk

2 teaspoons active dry yeast
2 1/2 tablespoons (15 gr) sugar
1 large egg
3 cups (360 gr) bread flour
1/3 cup (40 gr) all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup (55 gr) unsalted butter, softened

Topping:
1 egg, beaten
1 tablespoon water
Sesame or poppy seeds (optional)

1. In a glass measuring cup, combine one cup warm water, the milk, yeast and sugar. Let stand until foamy, about five minutes. Meanwhile, beat one egg.

2.  In the bowl of a food processor fitted with a dough blade, add both flours, salt and butter.  Pulse several times until the butter is blended in and the flour mixture resembles sand. Beat the egg and add to the flour mixture.
  
3.  With the food processor running, slowly pour in water mixture and mixing until the dough forms a ball.  

3. Lightly butter a large bowl.  Shape dough into a ball and place it in the buttered bowl. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm place until doubled in bulk, one to two hours.

4. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Using dough scraper, divide dough into 8 equal parts. Gently roll each into a ball, flatten slightly and shape into a disk. Arrange two to three inches apart on baking sheet. Cover loosely with a clean dish towel and allow to rise again for 1 to 1 1/2 hours or until the dough feels like a marshmallow when gently touched.

5. Preheat oven to 400 degrees with rack in center. Beat remaining egg with one tablespoon water and brush the tops and around the sides of the bun. Sprinkle with sesame seeds, if desired. Bake baking, until tops are golden brown, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool completely.  Makes 8 4 to 5-inch burger bun.  



Directions for an stand electric mixer:

2. In a large bowl of an electric mixer stir together flours with salt. Add butter and mix using the paddle attachment.  Add the yeast mixture until the dough forms a ball and is smooth and elastic.  







Sources:  New York Times; Parsley, Sage & Sweet

25 comments:

  1. A few weeks ago I read about the thing with the dough and the food processor and I was so mad that I almost cry. The flour here has barely 4% protein, so to make the gluten window you have to a) knead FOREVER b) buy gluten, make some math and mix it up yourself.
    But with the food processor it came out perfect in, just like you said, 3 minutes. I have been kneading until my arms almost fell for YEARS!! I'm now converted to the food processor method.

    Those buns look great, I hope that you are enjoying the grill!!
    Have a lovely weekend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a great weekend planting my garden, thank you. I can't believe your protein content is only 4%. I like to use a flour that is 12% protein content. You must be in great shape with all that kneading. Thank heaven for the food processor.

      Delete
    2. My arms have more muscle than my brother's...

      Delete
    3. Ha ha ha. Better get your brother kneading dough.

      Delete
    4. I feel the same way about kneading! Have you tried the recipe on here for crusty bread. NO KNEADING. And it looks like you bought it at a bakery :)

      Delete
    5. Yes, I did, I cook a loaf every week! It's great. Have you tried using half flour, half semolina?

      Delete
  2. Can not wait to try

    ReplyDelete
  3. Definitely a labor of love! They look delicious. Do you think it would work in a stand mixer? I don't actually have a food processor. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Gah! I just saw the answer to my own question in your printable recipe! You think of everything! Can't wait to try these, my husband will LOVE them!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha ha. You can even knead by hand. I hope you try these buns in your stand mixer and it's just as easy.

      Delete
  5. Hi Janet. I just came across your blog yesterday (better late than never) in search of a good burger. I think I spent my entire night just scrolling through, saving recipes, and just marveling at how awesome you are! Thank you for this blog and all the amazing food. You have one lucky family. I hope I can cook half as good as you when I have a family! Anyway just wanted to say you have a new fan, lol, I don't know if that's the right word? Stay marvelous Janet!
    p.s I'm going to take a shot at those pot stickers, so mouth watering, well see what happens!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why thank you for making my day. Pot stickers are amazing. I hope you come back often.

      Delete
    2. Go and make the chicken pot pie!!!!!

      Delete
  6. These buns are marvelous! Simple and very easy directions. Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I can't wait to try these. I already make your crusty bread at least once a week! Thanks for this ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you give them a try. They are a little more work than the crusty bread, but so worth the extra time. I hope you love them.

      Delete
  8. Let me start off by saying I LOVE your recipes! I am working through your breads (I am very new to bread making) and everything I make tastes amazing, I especially love the banana nut bread. I had a hard time with these, I was excited that you listed the conversions so that I could use my nifty scale for baking instead of my boyfriend steeling it to weigh car parts. Unfortunately I clearly don't know how to use the conversions you provided. Say for flour, 360gr=23gm and I know that's not right, so I assumed that the 360gr was meant to be 360gm... also wrong, proved by almost pancake batter buns. I ended up saving them, by figuring out the required weight and just subtracting what I already put in. Unfortunately because everything was already mixed the buns ended up not raising correctly. They may not look like buns but they still taste really good, I will defiantly be trying this one again! If you have some time, I would love to know how to work through your weight conversions. Also, are you not supposed to add egg if you use an electric mixer?
    Thank you for sharing these great recpies!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry for the mix up on conversion. I use a metric conversion chart that was requested from a few European followers. This is the chart that I use to convert. http://www.jsward.com/cooking/conversion.shtml I'm sorry to mess up your recipe for brioche buns. Maybe I should just stick to the U.S. standard measurements. :(

      Delete
  9. Is it 1/4 cup or 1/4 stick? Just wondering because some of the pictures look like 1/4 stick. I attempted these a couple days ago and the consistency of the dough seemed a bit weird with 1/4 cup. I probably messed something else up though. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  10. It's 1/4 cup. The dough should be soft and satiny. Let me know if I can help you trouble shoot.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Is it necessary to use bread flour..Can I make it with all purpose flour alone...And can I use salted butter instead of using unsalted butter...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course...to all of the above.

      Delete