Quick Homemade Almond Milk




If you ate at lease 3 pounds of homemade chocolates over the holidays, raise your hand.

If you snarfed down Becky's baklava, raise your hand.

If you had several helpings of Steamed Carrot Pudding, raise your hand.

If you over ate in general over the holidays, raise your hand.

If you have sworn off sugar and are cleansing your body from holiday overload, raise your hand.

I'm probably the only one with both hands high above my head!




I was lucky enough to have my most of my children home for the holidays along with my grandchildren. Most of our enjoyment came from food, however, which is the way it's supposed to be...right?

My oldest daughter was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis several years ago.  After several attempts with medication, including injections, without significant results, she decided to try to cure her colitis by strictly following a Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD).  She has become very creative in the kitchen thanks to the site Against All Grain that shares many recipes for those who are following a Paleo diet as well as SCD that have an autoimmune disease.

She cannot have dairy in her diet, so she began making her own nut milks.  Most commercial almond milks contains an additives and thickeners such as carrageenan.  She shared with me her quick version of almond milk using almond flour.  It is additive and preservative free.




I know what you are thinking...duh you an buy Almond milk...right?  Sure you can buy your own almond milk, but let me tell you once again that homemade is ALWAYS best.  Besides, by the time you find your car keys to go to the store to purchase almond milk, you can have this recipe made and chilling in the refrigerator.

This is how my daughter makes her Almond Milk.  you will need:

1 cup (230 gr) blanched Almond flour
pinch of sea salt
2 medjool dates, pits removed
1/2 vanilla bean or 1 teaspoon of vanilla
4-5 cups water (filtered is good)

Using Almond flour makes the recipe very quick and easy.  You don't have to soak almonds in water for 12 hours before making the milk.




Of course, if you have whole almonds and would like to use them instead of flour, simply soak 2 cups whole almonds for 12 hours.  After 12 hours drain the water off of the almonds and use in place of the almond flour.




Using a good quality blender, add 1 cup almond flour.




Drop in 2 pitted dates (for sweetness) and 1/2 vanilla bean or 1 teaspoon vanilla extract.




A healthy pinch of sea salt.




I start with 4 cups of water so that I don't blow the lid off of my blender.  Using filtered water is always a good idea.




Turn on the blender.




Allow the blender to run for a 3-4 minutes.  Making sure the dates and vanilla bean and ground down and mixed in well.




I'm adding the remaining cup of water with the blender on low speed.




My daughter suggested using a thin dish cloth instead of cheese cloth because the cheese cloth allows for some of the grit to flow through.  You can, also, purchase a nut bag.  I think my flour sack cloth works just great.

I like to wet the cloth and line a wire mesh strainer.  Place the strainer over a large bowl.




Pour the milk into the lined strainer.




The milk will flow through the cloth into the bowl.




Use a rubber spatula to stir the remaining almond meal to release more of the milk.




Gather up the cloth, twist and gently squeeze to release as much of the milk as possible.





Reserve the almond meal.  I spread the meal out on a baking sheet and placed it in a 140F oven until it was dry. I will use it again for making cookies or something.






Ta Da!  That's it.  

Refrigerate until cold.

Here's to a happy and healthy 2014. 






Homemade Almond Milk

1 cup (230 gr) almond flour or 2 cups whole almonds soaked in water for 12 hours**
2 Medjool dates, pitted
1/2 vanilla bean or 1 teaspoon (5 mL) vanilla extract
5 cups (960 mL) water
generous pinch of sea salt

Combine all ingredients in a blender with a tight fitting lid.  Blend on high speed for 3-4 minutes.  Pour liquid through a cloth lined strainer placed over a large bowl.  Strain almond milk through strainer.  Reserve almond meal for another use.  Refrigerate to chill.

Makes approx 5 cups almond milk

*Hazelnuts, pecans, cashews, etc.  




36 comments:

  1. This is basically the recipe I use for my almond milk (but I soak and dehydrate almonds regularly so always use those). I love that you have such a great variety of recipes. You are truly my foodie hero!

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  2. Hi there,

    I have online bought blanched almond flour (fine and microfine) - is cold water used or hot water to make the milk?

    Is it safe to use cold water? I am wanting to make almond yoghurt.

    Thanks

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    1. I use cold water all the time. Works great.

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  3. I would like to know how long the almond milk can keep in the fridge?

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    1. The longest I have been able to keep it is 1 week. It will go sour just like regular milk. Good thing it only takes a few minutes to whip up.

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  4. Wondering if you've ever tried using the leftover almond meal to make almond butter?

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    1. I haven't that's worth trying and a great idea. Hmmm I wonder if I should dry the meal out first or leave it wet. What are your thoughts?

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  5. I've used a recipe in the past where you place the blended almond and water in a pan and heat it up to 180 and hold it there for at least a minute, before cooling/chilling it.

    Don't know about the 'necessity' of that.... seemed like a way to help it hold in the fridge for a touch longer (by inhibiting bacterial growth) than it would otherwise, since it doesn't have any preservatives?

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    1. That's interesting. I have not come across a recipe that heats the milk, but completely understand the reasoning behind it. I like making my own almond milk because it is raw without being cooked or processed. It will eventually go sour just like milk after about 10 days. I just make a quart at a time. I hope this helps.

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  6. Thank you so much for your almond flour to make almond milk, You are the only one that has posted this recipe all the ones that I have seen are made of raw almonds not flour. My daughter has bags of blanched almond flour and would like to try making milk out of it.....Thank you

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    1. You are so welcome. The almond flour makes making milk a snap. I hope you love it.

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  7. When Im pressed for time I use two tablespoons of almond butter that I buy at my local supermarket in the healthfood section. Its a quick, no mess, no straining method which tastes great. I

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    1. FABULOUS idea. Thanks for sharing this quick tip. I'll definitely give it a try.

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    2. Immake my own almond butter, keep it in the fridge and make milk from it as I go, mostly every day. Since our tap water is great quality, I just use that plus 2-3 ice cubes. Since I mostly use it on oats or müsli, I just run it through a fine tea strainer, which is so much quicker than using the nut bag. That milk is soooo good! Since I have been sick, I used store milk today, it'll never taste the same after I made my own for some weeks. It truly tastes a lot better. i also add dates for sweetness, but I usually leave vanilla out. I read somewhere that the almond butter will keep for a week or two in the fridge... I had a batch sitting for around 3 months and it made great milk! I usually have to add some oil (I use canola) to be able to make the almond butter, my blenders just struggle too much, I can't get it all the way, even with the high speed blender... which is a bit of a pain, which is why I wonder if I might get a mill and make flour or more correct, almond meal, instead (store bought almond flour is very pricey here). I was wondering if an electric coffee grinder would work or if I should get a good, old, hand crank almond mill... :)

      I have not tried to pasteurize my almond milk, which is what you do when you heat it like the lady above mention... would make it last a lot longer...

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  8. What is the purpose of the dates? Can it be made without?

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    1. The purpose of the dates is just for sweetness. It can be made without.

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  9. I just made almond milk literally 6 minutes ago! After I was done, I thought to myself "why not almond flour, instead". Praise Google! Yours was one of the first relevant search results. Thank you.

    I am also looking into making the almond flour myself.

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    1. I know! It's faster than running to the store to purchase almond milk and so much better. Thanks for your comment. Making almond flour is a great idea. I'll start researching.

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  10. I recommend reserving one cup of water from the recipe. I blend that with the damp meal for a few seconds and strain.

    It is a very effective way to achieve maximum extraction.

    This tip is probably more helpful for those who use whole almonds, but it should be helpful when using almond flour as well.

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    1. Fabulous tip! Thank you so much.

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  11. I found this wonderful recipe first and have made it a bunch of times. I once read another blog that didn't bother straining out the almond meal, she called it rustic. I am going to try that now. I just made a jar of overnight oats using this recipe but I didn't strain it. Since I always incorporate the milk into a recipe, instead of a beverage by itself, I imagine I won't taste/feel the grit and maybe it will be more nutritious. Will let you know the results tomorrow. Thanks!

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    1. I'm anxious to hear about your results. I would think it would be great on soaked oats and add more nutrition. Yum.

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  12. This was the best recipe I have came across, considering I didn't have any whole almonds but instead bags of almond flour. It tastes so much better than store bought, and is obviously a lot cheaper and less packaging waste.

    It tastes delicious and sweet without all the unhealthy cooked preservatives.


    Thank you! (The only problem was finding a container to fit it in - maybe I'll keep the plant milk containers and fill them)

    This made 1L for me and was very quick ( 5 minutes)

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    1. I'm with you, Stephanie. I hate purchased almond milk because of the thickeners and preservatives. The plant based milks are way to thick for my liking. I'm glad you like it. I use old glass milk bottles to store my almond milk. I'm switching to using glass more and more. Thanks for your comment and sharing your success.

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    2. Stephanie Aerts - I have found my favorite containers to keep almond milk in, they are protein powder shakers. They are easy to strain the milk into, put the top on and before pouring, you give it a good shake. They come with a grate or a ball that helps shake it well to combine. They are great to pour from. I did find 1 liter ones on eBay, but they were expensive to ship overseas, so I settled for 2 0.7 liter ones, which is a great size for my use. I also have a half liter one. Together they more than cover my need. Somehow I was a bit skeptic to using plastic for milk, but that was unnecessary, I love these containers, they are so practical and so easy to clean in the dishwasher (hate washing bottles, even with the easy chain and shake method)... :)

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  13. This was really great, thanks!

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    1. You are so welcome. I'm so glad you liked it. Thanks for the comment.

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  14. Do you think it would freeze well? I buy a cartoon a week of nutmilk for chia pudding and smoothies- so it would not be drunk on its own but blended into something else. Thoughts?

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    1. I have actually never frozen nut milks before. The shelf life refrigerated is only about 5-7 days. Freezing it is surely worth a try.

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  15. Also, do you think you could use other nut flours?

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    1. Sure, why not? I used a combo of hazelnut meal and almonds flour to mix it up or a unsweetened coconut milk in the blend.

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  16. I want to thank you very deeply for sharing this recipe. Recently I have developed an allergy to corn (in addition to already having dairy, gluten, yeast, commercial citric acid allergies to name a few) making it impossible for me to drink commercially made almond milk. Any food that is fortified has corn in it because it is used as a carrier for the vitamins. The store where we regularly shop seems to almost always be out of raw almonds, and I've tried making almond milk from almond butter (it was gross.) I was panicked that I wouldn't be able to have almond milk regularly anymore.

    I think using almond flour is brilliant. It's also something we regularly have on hand. Plus it reduces the leftover packaging and I'm left with some fabulous almond okara leftover. That was one thing I missed having after making homemade milk since I use it in vegan burger patties.

    I mixed up a batch of almond milk for my husband to use in some vegan white sauce for dinner. It turned out just perfect. I used Bob's Red Mill superfine Almond Flour and 1 c. is 112g. so it was a bit thinner than it could be but I can always adjust it later if I feel the need. :)

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  17. I have had either soy or almond milk (I can't remember which) that had gotten frozen. It still had a good smell, but it flopped out in gelatinous blobs that made me want to vomit because of its look and feel.

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    1. Yuck. Purchased grocery store plant based milks generally have carrageenan or guar gum added to thicken the milk. I'm not a fan of the thick versions myself. i wish they would stop added thickeners.

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  18. Thank you so much for the recipe!! I was inspired to make my own after drinking freshly made almond milk. None of the almond meal was ever discarded though!

    I haven't tested my blender to see if it will make it as smooth as the one I drank, but do you recommend keeping the almond meal in the milk?

    Thanks!

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    1. I always remove the almond meal. It's personal preference. Leaving the almond meal makes the milk gritty and thick. I wanted a thinner consistency. I believe it's personal preference. If you like the meal in the milk, then leave it in.

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