Caramels, Hand Dipped Chocolates and Chocolates Giveaway




The chocolates are dipped and the halls are decked.  Now I can relax and enjoy the season.

Chocolates have become our family tradition...I dip, the family eats.



Each year I'm more determined to make my chocolates better.  Fresh ingredients.  Nothing artificial.  I culture butter for my centers.  I have to admit my English Toffee rocks due to the full pound of fresh cultured butter.

I'm so excited to share my caramel recipe with you.




You will need:

2 cups light corn syrup
1 (14-oz) can sweetened condensed milk
1 1/2 cup milk
1 cup whipping cream
1 cup butter
4 cups sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla



Before you begin to make the caramel, make sure you can devote a full hour or so to the preparation.  No interruptions.  Focus.  It's all about the caramel.  Phone calls, texts, etc. can wait.

Prepare the pan before you begin to cook the caramel by lining a 9 x 13-inch pan with nonstick aluminum foil.  Butter the foil lightly.  I realize it's nonstick, but I want to make sure the caramel released with ease.




The key to making great candy is a good heavy pan.  This will prevent the candy from scorching or burning.  For the caramel you will need a 6 quart pan.  As the mixture comes to a boil the caramel will rise up the sides of the pan.  It's not a fun mess to clean up when it boils over the top of the pan onto your cook top.

To the large, heavy pan add 2 cups corn syrup.




1 (14-oz) can sweetened condensed milk.




1 1/2 cups milk.  I use whole milk.



1 cup heavy cream.




4 cups sugar.




Stir until completely blended.

*This is important**.  Watch the sides of your pan.  If you have stirred the mixture vigorously, there might be sugar crystals present around the sides of the pan.  Sugar crystals are an enemy to making candy.  The last thing you want is candy that has turned to sugar.  Meaning there will be a sugary crunch in every bite.  The candy must be smooth and creamy on your tongue.

Wash down any sugar crystals you may see around the edges of the pan with a wet pastry brush.  Continue to watch and wash as the caramel cooks.







Add 1 cup butter.




Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat stirring constantly.




Did you catch that?  STIRRING CONSTANTLY!  That means the whole time the caramel is cooking.

You will notice that the caramel will begin to thicken and the color will darken.




Shout out to my OXO spatula that can take heat up to 600 degrees or so.  I LOVE It.  I love how the spatula scrapes around the bottom edges of the pan.

The caramel will begin to sound different.  The bubbles will make a bit of a popping sound.




Clip on a candy thermometer and continue to stir.

A word (or more) about thermometers:

A good candy thermometer is not absolutely necessary, but very useful.  A thermometer needs to be tested before its initial use.  To do this, place the thermometer in a pan with enough water to cover the bulb.  Bring the water to a boil and let the water boil for several minutes.  Read the temperature at eye level; if you look down, the temperature will appear to be lower than it actually is.  Note the temperature of which the water boils.  It will probably be between 200-212F (95-100C),

If the water boils at any temperature other than 212F (100C),adjust the temperature accordingly.

Such as:  If your water begins to boil and the thermometer reaches 200F (93C) subtract 12 degrees from the recipe.




Notice how the caramel has darkened and has thickened.




I know my caramel is perfect when my thermometer reaches 232F.




Even though I have a thermometer I still use the cold water test.  Drop a spoonful of the caramel into a small bowl of cold water.




If the caramel holds it's shape and can be formed into a ball, it's cooked.  A soft ball stage will be soft the the touch and not firm.  The ball will droop when picked up.

When the caramel has reached a softball stage (which is the stage I prefer), remove from the heat.




Add two teaspoons of vanilla.

OMGosh I found the best vanilla at TJMaxx.  It is Madagascar Bourbon with Tahitian Vanilla Bean.

AMAZZZZING!




Gently stir in vanilla.  After stirring the vanilla do not agitate or stir the vanilla anymore.  This is not a good caramel recipe to use for turtles or pecan logs.  Agitation will cause the caramel to turn to sugar, which is not good.





Carefully pour the hot caramel into the prepared pan.  DO NOT  scrape the sides of the pan.  Just let the caramel pour into the prepared pan.  Any caramel stuck to the sides of bottom of the pan continue to cook while pouring.  If you scrape the caramel out, it will be harder because it has a higher temperature and the caramel will have soft and hard bites.  I just scrape the remains onto a buttered plate and we eat at it for a few days.

Once the caramel has cooled cover and let sit for 24 HOURS!

That's TWENTY FOUR (24) HOURS!!  

The caramel will cut so much nicer and will hold it's shape and dip beautifully.



When ready to cut, after 24 hours, tip the caramel upside down onto a cutting board.

You will notice that this particular batch has pecans in it.  My addition for kicks and giggles and because I can't leave caramel along if it contains nuts.  It's an optional thing.  I opted.



Crazy, but I discovered that the caramel will cut much easier and hold its shape if you cut it upside down.  Meaning once you turn it out leave the bottom of the caramel up.

Cut caramel into whatever shape size you desire.




I like to place the squares that I'm dipping onto a sheet of buttered nonstick foil.




My chocolate is melted time to temper.  For info on chocolate tempering, check out my last year post for Gingerbread truffles.



I'm ready for mass production.  Meaning that I have to dip each caramel separately by hand which will take me about 2 hours.  Ugh.  It's all part of the experience.

I put a TV in my kitchen and watch all my favorite chick flicks while dipping.  Sense and Sensibility (all time fav), Pride and Prejudice, Emma, Moonstuck, While you were sleeping, Downton Abbey, Call the Midwife (watched season 1)....



Ten pounds of melted chocolate.  Waiting to be tempered.

How I would kill for a tempering machine.






Tempering the melted chocolate by stirring on a cold marble slab.










Not my prettiest caramel.  If only I had another hand....

Repeat.




Sprinkle tops with sea salt for an amazing dipped caramel.




 If you aren't ready for the dipping experience, wrap the caramels in waxed paper or plastic wrap.







Whatever you beliefs may be, I wish you a very happy holiday season.  I hope you enjoy family, food and friends as you celebrate your beliefs.

Once again I want to share my beliefs with you with this short Christmas message




Because I love you, and because it's Christmas, I would love to send out three boxes of chocolates to anyone out there interested in my homemade goodies.  Fill out the form at the bottom of the page.  I will do a random drawing on Friday, Lucky December 13th, 2013.  I'm happy to ship anywhere in the world, so please enter wherever you are.  Last year I asked for everyone to leave a comment regarding Christmas food traditions.  I absolutely LOVED reading about your family traditions.  I like to hear more about your food memories and traditions.  I'm so excited.

XOXO


Wonderful Caramels

2 cups light corn syrup
1 (14-oz) can sweetened condensed milk
1 1/2 cups milk
1 cup whipping cream
1 cup butter
4 cups sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla
2 cups pecans, if desired
Tempered dipping chocolate, if desired

Line a 9 x 13-inch pan with nonstick foil and lightly butter; set aside.  In a heavy 6-quart pan, combine corn syrup, condensed milk, milk, cream, butter and sugar.  Place over medium heat and stir constantly until mixture comes to a boil.  Wash down the sides of the pan if sugar crystals are present.  Clip on a candy thermometer, cook stirring constantly until temperature reaches 232F  or until mixture forms a soft-ball.  (origial recipe calls for a temperature of 240F (115C) but I though that the caramel was too hard.  Pour into prepared pan do not scrape the sides of the pan. Let sit for 24 hours before cutting.  Makes about 117 1-inch pieces.  Recipe from "Candymaking", which is one fabulous candy recipe book.



When you post a comment here for the giveaway, it is recorded on googles docs.  Each comment is private and I'm the only one that can read the comments keeping your name and email address private as well.  I have been so touched by the comments that I'd like to post them as well.  I am going to post comments with only a first name.  Your remaining info will be kept private.  If you do not wish to have your comment posted just let me know.  Thank you so much.

Enter daily...I don't care.  You don't have to give a tradition each time you enter, unless you want to keep sharing. I love to read all the great traditions.  

77 comments:

  1. Looks delicious! What is cultured butter?

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    1. I just added the link: http://www.simplysogood.com/2012/11/homemade-cultured-butter.html
      Cultured butter is made my adding yogurt to cream and letting it sit for 24-48 hours which cultures the cream. Just beat the cultured cream in a mixer and within a couple of minutes you have wonderful butter and amazing buttermilk.

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  2. Hmmm, I sent this once, but it's not showing up. I must have done something wrong. ANYWAY, some of our favorite "must haves" for the holidays are Namaimo Bars, Butter Tarts and Sausage Rolls. We lived in Canada for 18 years and these traditional holiday foods stuck when we came back stateside.

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  3. Your caramels are delicious. I've been making them for years now. My sister in law use to be in your ward, and got the recipe from one of the church cook books. They are SOOO yummy!
    One of my recent traditions is making cinnamon rolls for my friends and family. I became single some years back and could not afford to buy gifts for all my single friends, so I made cinnamon rolls for them and their families. I gave them uncooked so they could cook them at home and enjoy them. It has been a hit each year. A few of my friends have even come over to help make them.
    I enjoy your blog!
    Jackie

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  4. This recipe is the scariest one I have ever seen. You are awesome.

    In Argentina we have Christmas Eve Dinner, and we are mostly Italians, so our tradition is to EAT. A lot. During hours. Usually we start around 8 pm with vermouth, cured meat and cheese and finish by 3 am with cider and turrón. After that we pass out and then we get toghether again to have lunch with the leftovers plus a few things more. Aaand we repeat it a week later for New Year's Eve Dinner. Aaaaaand this year, the next day we have to go to work (good.luck.with.that).

    Well, we may have one tradition in Christmas: someone gets picked up as the delivery guy and must hand out the presents, while everyone else munches on the pan dulce, the garrapiñada and the turrón.
    And another one in New Year: we, the cousins, try our best the lit up a paper lantern every year. And we fail spectacularly every year. Somebody call the Guinness World Records guys!

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  5. Amber C: It used to be the butterscotch rolls for Christmas morning breakfast but I think my favorite now is the real gingerbread houses we make. We used graham crackers when I when growing up but I'm now in charge of making real gingerbread for our houses and I adore the way it smells!

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  6. Jenni:
    I love baking Christmas cookies, I remember baking them with my mom when I was growing up and we would deliver plates full of cookies to neighbors and friends. Now my boys help me bake and last year we had a baby girl so I can't wait to include her in the tradition too!

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  7. Carol W:
    I am serving a mission right now and I am overwhelmed at the great love people have for missionaries. I have 14 missionaries in my mission that don't have family support and when I sent an email to family and friends to buy Christmas gifts for these 14 missionaries, within 30 minutes I had all the missionaries taken care of. This is the third year I have sent out an email to friends and family in helping humble missionaries without family assistance. Despite economical times, people jump at the chance to help others in need. Our tradition is to help missionaries that don't have family support as these missionaries appreciate anything and everything that is given to them.

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    1. Amazing story. I'm so glad you shared that with me. If you ever need anymore help, I have an army of women that would jump at that chance to help the missionaries any where, any time. God bless and Merry Christmas.

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  8. Barbara P:
    Beginning Thanksgiving evening, it is all about cookies in our home. We spend a month making cookie dough of every possible flavor. E roll them, shape them and freeze them. Then throughout the month we bake them as needed. We supply platters and baskets of porkies for school functions, parties , etc. we also make up beautiful gift baskets and drop them off at friends and neighbors houses.my hour boys love this, and we have really taught them that Christmas is not about one day of getting presents, rather it is a season, a special spirit, of thinking of others and sharing our sweets and good fortune. Merry Christmas!!!!

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  9. Keri:
    an orange and a coca cola in the stocking!!

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  10. Beth C:
    Nana's Fudge! My Mother-in-law Ethel, aka Nana, made the most amazing old-fashioned milk chocolate fudge ... no chocolate chips or marshmallow ... just sugar, cocoa, milk and a little salt ... cooked to the "soft-ball" stage and then allowed to rest with butter and vanilla until it was ready to be stirred into perfection by Pap-pap's or one of the boys' strong arms. We swore she used a magic pot and spoon, because no one could duplicate her fudge. We all tried to make Nana's fudge, but none of us really every succeeded ... it just never tasted the same. She graciously tried to teach each of us ... we just didn't have her loving touch. Nana passed away 18 months ago. Didn't even try to make the fudge last year ... too soon and we were still immersed in grief. But this year, the family asked if I would try one more time. And so, after reading your advice about themometers I might add ... and something she never used, I decided to attemptNana's Fudge one more time. I could never make it while Nana was alive, but I can now proudly say I have mastered Nana's Fudge. Only the best ingredients (which she always insisted on and we usually ignored), produced a creamy, smooth chocolate delight! It's a traditon I'm glad we'll be able to continue!

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    1. I'm so happy you have mastered your Nana's fudge. What a great legacy you are continuing. I have to admit that is one candy I have not mastered. We learn from the best.

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  11. Carol W:

    When I return home from my mission, I would love to learn how to dip chocolates. Will you be teaching a class next Christmas season? P.S. I love your blog. I have made several of your recipes for my missionaries and they are always delicious! You are a fantastic cook not to mention writing an excellent blog with explicit instructions. I consistently find fabulous recipes on your blog. Thank you

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    1. I'm not sure about teaching a class, but anyone is welcome in my kitchen while I'm dipping. I would love to have you in my kitchen.

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  12. Melinda:

    "prime rib on Christmas eve....
    And of course Christmas cookies!"

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  13. Danielle:
    I have fond childhood memories of Christmas eve. I don't remember exactly what we ate as much as the ambience. We set up the food in front of the fire place in the living room where we hung out until the wee hours of the night, eating, talking, signing and playing games. Since we often had a house full of guests throughout the year, private family times like these were truly special.

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  14. Jen J:

    My favorite holiday food tradition is making homemade caramels for my family and friends. People start asking me in October when it will be caramel making time and I just have to tell them to be patient. I think that yours are marvelous too Janet and I love that you put so much work into your chocolates and then share them with all of us!

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  15. Tammie D:

    "I eat it all! Love your chocolates and blog. Wish I could come get a personal class but I live in Texas Boo
    "

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  16. Kristi E:
    We make Rouladen for Christmas dinner every year. Our family has done this for 4 generations at least.

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  17. Kerstin S:

    We have Swedish Christmas Eve every year- I love it!

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  18. Marsha B:
    Oh, your candies all look wonderful! I just found your blog not too long ago and I am enjoying everything you write about. I love ham for Christmas with the green bean casserole, mashed potatoes and all the other trimmings. I love to bake cookies, but with just my hubby and me, we don't need to eat all the cookies!

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  19. Brittany P:
    Christmas Day we have a traditional English dinner with prime rib and pop-overs because your recipes taught my mom how to make it! I also love the fresh cranberry/pomegranate jello we have with It too! My mom won the golden ticket last week I hope mine comes on Friday the 13th! ;)

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    1. Ha ha. I can't wait until your are up to your elbows in chocolate. Your mom is going to create so many memories for her girls. Lucky daughters...and sons.

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  20. Christine:
    Every year, a couple weekends before Christmas, my family gets together and spends an entire weekend baking our hearts out. We bake tons of treats to share with family, friends, coworkers, neighbors, etc. I love it because we get to spend some extra time together during the holidays and I always leave with tons of yummy treats to share.

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  21. Lindsey:
    My dad has always made clam chowder and challah for the family on christmas eve. When I was 15 I decided to become a vegetarian and my dad, not wanting to leave me out of the tradition, made me my own pot of potato chowder on christmas eve. It is delicious and he has made it for me, without fail, for the past 14 years. Thanks, dad!

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  22. Hope M:
    In my house, every year we make a birthday cake for Jesus (because everyone needs a cake for their birthday, after all). The cake is any flavor (typically chocolate) and is surrounded by so many happy family memories that it always taste amazing!

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  23. Ally C:
    My favorite holiday food tradition is eating pannetone and my mom's homemade hot chocolate on christmas eve. :)

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  24. Kate:
    Making and decorating sugar cookies with my mom.

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  25. Lori:
    My mom would make homemade caramel pecan sticky buns for breakfast on Christmas morning. A labor of love for sure!

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  26. Shelby:

    Gingerbread Cookies!

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  27. Debra G:

    Growing up my mom always made homemade scalloped potatoes and a full size ham on Christmas morning. We still make this simply delicious meal but have moved it to Christmas Eve Dinner. I learned to bake from her and my grandmother and still make so many of their special treats along with many from my baking business. Food and family filling the home...nothing better!! Oh except maybe to win this yummy giveaway!! Here's hoping!! Merry Christmas to you and your family!!

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  28. Rosalie:
    My mother was born in New Mexico and my Dad in Spain. So I was brought up on a variety of ethnic food. For +-mas, I make tamales, Biscochitos, Posole, and pork strips marinated in red chile that's eaten with flour tortillas. I was the only one in a rather large family who learned how to make both the flour tortillas and corn tortillas. On +mas Eve we have the Spanish side: a Paella with lots of seafood. ( When my son was little, he asked why we shorten Christmas with an "x"? He thought it made more sense to use a "cross". Your candy looks delectable!

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    1. I want to come to your house. I want to learn how to make your entire menu.

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  29. Katie:
    Every year for at Thanksgiving my grandfather would challenge me to a pie eating contest; who ever ate one slice from as many pies wins. He always did this because he knew he would win, as I never liked pecan pie or mincemeat. My grandfather was my favorite person in the world. He died some years ago, and every Thanksgiving I still feel completely guiltless in eating as many slices of pie as I want, because it reminds me of my amazing grandfather.

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    1. Oh, I'm so touched. What fond memories.

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  30. Vanessa:
    On Christmas Eve we eat pirogy as part of our Slovak traditional meal. We have at least 4 different kinds (lekvar, cottage cheese, cabbage & potato) Sometimes we try making a new variety, but these are the ones guaranteed to be there! When we were younger, my sisters, cousins and I would sit around the dinner table, once all was cleaned up and eat clementines & grapes. We would use the orange peel and squeeze it next to a candle flame to ignite the oils in the peel :) We still sometimes do that even as adults now :)

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    1. My mouth is watering. What a wonderful family gathering.

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  31. Laura:
    "I live in Cork City in Ireland and a very popular thing to eat here at Christmas is Spiced beef. We prepare it on Christmas Eve. It is a Silverside of beef that has been rubbed with a special mix of herbs which include Allspice, juniper berries,cloves pepper , salt and other 'secret' ingrediants. People buy it from the butcher as the process of doing it yourself can take weeks. It is then boiled for 2-3 hours. The smell around the house is so distinctive and really says Christmas to me. It is served on Christmas day alongside the Turkey and Ham. It is also delicious in a sandwich with horse radish sauce. When I was a child I thought every county in Ireland had this and although it is getting more popular now it has its roots firmly based in my home city of Cork.
    Thank you so much for writing your lovely blog."

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    1. I want to have that aroma in my home. The beef sounds so amazing. I'm so happy you found my blog in Ireland. What a great tradition and story. Thank you so much for sharing with me. I will always remember City of Cork.

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  32. Mary Ann G:
    "Every Christmas morning before going to the tree to open Christmas gifts, the children had to eat some traditional Swedish rice pudding. This is a tradition that came from my childhood, supposedly from a long ago ancestor from Sweden ( or maybe that was just a good story!) Rice pudding reminds me of my mother and grandmother and nutmeg and coziness!
    I often serve it with raspberry sauce, and hide an almond in it to see who can find their almond first.
    "

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    1. My best friends mother is from Norway. I was always so jealous of this same tradition that her family had. They would sprinkle the porridge/pudding with cinnamon, nutmeg and a pat of butter. She told me how exciting it was to be the one to find the almond. Thank you for sharing.

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  33. Lindsey:
    We make your french toast bread pudding for Christmas breakfast every year! SO tasty. We also have Chinese food for Christmas dinner :)

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  34. Cathy:
    "Pies we always had delicious pies for Christmas,savory and sweet.
    I will be trying these caramels I have tried them before but didn't have much luck but love the detail you have given.
    "

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  35. Kate:
    My mom makes absolutely amazing poppyseed cookies with chocolate centers. She finally handed over the recipe a few years ago. I am excited to take them to a cookie exchange this year, but I can't share the recipe with my new friends!

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  36. Daniela:
    We cook for three days straight, my mom, my grandma and me; and while we are cooking we serve each other liters and liters of mate and chat non stop.

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  37. Megan G:
    I also love to make candy! !!! When I was 10 and living back east I needed my mom to make pecan logs and she said she would if I shelled all the pecans her parents sent her from texas. I did and she used her mothers caramel recipe and made a divinity veneer and she would dip the log of divinity in the hot caramel and then roll it in the freshly shelled pecans. My fingers were bleeding but I think those were my favorite pecan logs ever! !! I've made them many times since and have found much easier ways to make them.

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    1. Fresh pecans are the best. That is why your mom's pecan logs were so good. It was your labor of love and blood for the finishing touch of fresh pecans. So fun.

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  38. Lauren:
    My mom's homemade White Chocolate & Pecan popcorn with hot chocolate Christmas Eve.

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  39. Monica:
    Is it sad that I have to enter here to get your chocolates! My mom is only so kind with the ones you give her. Favorite food tradition is the cheeseball that was first given to our family as a gift and we have been making ever since.

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    1. Oh Monica. We need to get together more often. We need to have a kitchen party with all the girls and make goodies. Charees would love it. I only wish she hadn't moved...ugh.

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  40. Jessica:
    i have two small children (3 &4) and they love to get in the kitchen on christmas eve and bake santa chocolate chip cookies, and we leave fresh carrots for the reindeer. baking with the kids and creating the magic of christmas is definitely my favorite holiday food tradition.

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    1. Cherish these times with your children. They are the best years. I love that you are establishing tradition with your little family.

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  41. Phyllis:
    We love to make pizelles and rosettes. My husband is Italian and these Christmas goodies were always made by his Mom. I roll the pizelles and then dip in chocolate. Really yummy! Thank you for the caramel recipe. P

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  42. Valentina:
    "Ny favorite holiday food tradition are different patties like meat, green onion and specially cabbage. My mom made it always. I like specially curds patties, in Russia
    name vatrushki. We have a lot food traditions,maybe I cann't write down here all of it. I'm from Russia and I learn English. I like to read your blog, because it very interesting for me."

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    1. Your English is fabulous. Thank you for sharing your Russian traditions. I want to come to your house for Christmas.

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  43. Sarah:
    Can't wait to make these. The hand dipped chocolate may be a bit much for me to handle. A favorite for us is gingerbread cookies from colonial Williamsburg. My husband went to college there and I visited a lot as a child.

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  44. Kristen H:
    Baking cookies, hands down. I've slowly taken over baking most of our Christmas cookies, using recipes that my mom and grandma have made for years. My favorite are Neopolitan cookies (some people call them rainbow cookies). They're 6 different layers, and a labor of love, but everyone's favorite! It's my daughter's first Christmas this year, and I can't wait until she's old enough to start "helping" me in the kitchen!

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  45. Alisha M:
    My favorite thing to make around christmas time is fresh homemade molasses crinkles. They are similar to gingerbread cookies but they are moist and also extremely delicious!

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  46. Meredith:
    Making cookies with my mom!

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  47. I can't believe I sitting here crying while I read about your family traditions and the amazing food. I want to come to everyone's home for Christmas to watch and learn. I love family and I love reading about your families. What a wonderful Christmas I am having. Thank you so much for sharing.

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  48. I always fix a standing rib roast for Christmas and my family loves it...but the thing I love most is all the baking.
    Cinnamon rolls, pound cakes, cookies, and yeast rolls are done as gifts. I also make truffles...my son's favorite!

    Thank you for sharing so much here! Now I'm off to search out some of your chocolate recipes!

    Care to share any chocolate book titles?

    Merry Christmas and God bless you and your family!

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    1. My favorite Candy book in called "Candymaking" by Ruth Kendrick. She's an awesome dipper and now has a business making beautiful chocolates called "Chocolat" Thanks for sending your family traditions. They just make my mouth water. After reading all the comments Christmas boils down to just being with family. It's the best.

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  49. When do you add the nuts to the caramel? I’ve tried with mixed results. Sometimes it’s perfect, and other times it get sugary with little sugar crystals throughout, but the part without nuts is great. Thanks for your reply

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    1. This is the tricky part about caramel. Once removed from the heat you do not want any agitation because this will cause the crystals to form. I poured 2 cups pecans into the bottom of the pan and carefully poured the caramel over the nuts. My fingers are crossed, but so far no sugar present.

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  50. These look amazing! My grandfather used to make homemade chocolates when I was a child and they were the best I ever had! I bet yours are just as good. :)

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    1. I bet your grandpa's are better. They just always are because of who makes them. Mine will never be as good as my grandmothers.

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  51. These look awesome and I love all of the detailed pictures! I have never had good luck with caramel in the past likely because I didn't have a candy thermometer. I have one for this year's baking and look forward to try this recipe!

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    1. Good luck on the recipe. I'm sure your caramels will be fantastic. Thanks for the comment.

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  52. I love your tutorial on dipping chocolates. I wish I were brave enough to try it. It reminds me of my mom making candies for the holidays. My favorite was the English Toffee which I would stuff myself with at every opportunity.

    Thanks for bringing back precious Christmas season memories.

    Blessings,

    Cassandra from Renaissance Women

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    1. Thank you so much Cassandra. I'm with you on the English Toffee. That stuff is so hard to stop eating. I love it!

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  53. Dark chocolate over carmel is my absolute favorite!!! Your pictures are amazing. Thanks for sharing the process.

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  54. Yummy! The look so delicious!
    wow, awesome pics
    Those are beautiful! I love the topping on the second cake.
    Looks Wonderful.
    Wow that is amazing.
    Thanks.

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  55. I love all of your recipes, but making homemade chocolates is a little ambitious for me. I love drooling over your pictures though. :-) Dark chocolate anything is my favorite!

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  56. Our favorite tradition is Christmas Breakfast Sausage Casserole from All Recipes.com. I put the casserole in the oven when the presents are being opened. It's so delicious.

    Happy Holidays to all.

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  57. It’s the last day to enter and I STILL want to win. Thanks for your offer to share.

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  58. Great Thanks for sharing ideas with us
    Delicious !!! Yummy!!

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