3.15.2010

Crusty Bread



Crusty Bread

3 cups unbleached all purpose flour
1 3/4 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon Instant or Rapid-rise yeast
1 1/2 cups water


In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, salt and yeast.  Add water and mix until a shaggy mixture forms.  Cover bowl with plastic wrap and set aside for 12 - 18 hours.  Overnight works great.  Heat oven to 450 degrees.  When the oven has reached 450 degrees place a cast iron pot with a lid in the oven and heat the pot for 30 minutes.  Meanwhile, pour dough onto a heavily floured surface and shape into a ball.  Cover with plastic wrap and let set while the pot is heating.  Remove hot pot from the oven and drop in the dough.  Cover and return to oven for 30 minutes.  After 30 minutes remove the lid and bake an additional 15 minutes.  Remove bread from oven and place on a cooling rack to cool. 

I must begin by saying where the recipe originated, if in fact it originated anywhere...really.  I think bread has been baked for centuries using flour, salt, water, and yeast or other form of leavening.  As far as I know the recipe for "No-Knead" bread dough was printed in the New York times.  I don't know what month, day, or year.  The originator is Jim Lahey of Sullivan Street Bakery.  That's all I know.  I found the recipe in a booklet using enamel cast iron pots.  At the time I posted the recipe I had no Jim Lahey even existed or I would have definitely given the man full credit for this wonderful bread and idea.  That said....


Remember before beginning to create, that this bread is highly forgiving.  Don't stress over the fact that you haven't proofed the yeast or that you're not giving the dough a second rising time.  It's super duper sticky and will stick to your hands, feet and hair or anything else it comes in contact with.  Play with the recipe for your location.  Altitudes differ and that can affect the bread.  This recipe is not your ordinary bread recipe.  Just chill and follow the instructions

Breathe.  



You do NOT have to have an enamel covered cast iron pot. You can use anything with a lid that can take the heat.  I use a 5.5 quart cast iron pot.  My oval pots are about 7 quarts.
You DO NOT need to oil the pot. At least not in a enamel covered cast iron or regular cast iron pot.  I have never had problems with the bread sticking.




In a large mixing bowl add 3 cups white unbleached flour.




To the flour add 1 3/4 teaspoon salt (I use kosher I like it) and 1/2 teaspoon rapid rise or instant yeast.  

Note:  Regular active yeast can be used in place of the instant or rapid rise yeast.  It will need to be activated in 1/4 cup warm water.  Stir and let sit for 5-10 minutes.  However, most of the comments I have received state that the rapid raise works the best.  You choose.



Whisk the flour, salt and yeast together.




Add 1 1/2 cups water. 




Mix in the water.  I love these "spoonula's".  I use them all the time.




That's it!  The dough will look like a shaggy mess.  That's ok. 




Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let it set for 12 - 18 hours on the counter top.  DO NOT REFRIGERATE.  This is not optional.  It takes that much time to proof the dough.  The reason why you need a large bowl, is because the dough will start to rise.




After 12 hours the dough will look like this.  It's pretty sticky, but that's ok it's supposed to be.




Meet my blue Le Creuset.  It's so awesome.  Preheat your oven to 450 degrees.  As soon as it has heated to 450 degrees place your pot with the lid in the oven and pre-heat the pot for 30 minutes.





Right after you put the pan in the oven to preheat, dump the dough out onto a HEAVILY floured surface.  I love my pastry cloth.  Use it for everything.
Now, please disregard that this dough has stuff in it.  I'll get to that later.  I just forgot to take a picture of the plain version.  This dough has also been doubled so it's twice the size of a single batch.  After you dump the dough on to a floured surface shape it into a round ball.   This will rest for 30 minutes while the pan is heating.




After you shape the dough cover it with the plastic wrap that was over the bowl.  Yes, I know I have two loaves of bread.  It's because I doubled the recipe.  You can do that.




Remove the pot from the oven and carefully pick up the ball of dough and drop it into the pot.  You may want to flour your hands, because the dough is going to stick like crazy.  Remember the pan is now 450 degrees hot!  Be careful.  Put the lid on the pot and return it to the oven for 30 minutes.




I am baking two loaves at once.  Please notice how used my Le Creuset pots are.  Everything is my kitchen is heavily used.  If you have any advice as to how I can clean my babies, please let me know. 

Close the oven door and bake for 30 minutes.  Wait until you see the next picture.  This will blow you away!



Holy cow!  Can you believe how gorgeous that is.  When you put the dough into the pan, it looks like a shaggy mess and when you take of the lid, you have a masterpiece.  Remove the lid from the pot and continue to bake for another 15 minutes.  This is when you can start patting yourself on the back while telling yourself how awesome you are...because you ARE. 




I just have to show you more pictures of the bread after the lid has been taken off.  Scroll down and enjoy the beauty.










This is the finished product.  Remove from the oven and carefully remove bread from the pot.  Remember the pot is HOT.  I use a couple of hot pads and carefully pull out the bread.





Place the bread on a cooling rack until completely cooled.  That's it!  You did it!  How easy was that?  Now I'm going to show you just how much fun you can have with this recipe.  It's time to start creating different flavors.  I'm going to show you two different kinds of bread that I have made.





The first is Rosemary, Lemon and Gruyere.  This is the recipe I doubled.  So now all those chunks in the dough will make sense in the earlier picture.






Remember I doubled the recipe.  In the large bowl I have 6 cups flour, 3 1/2 teaspoons salt and 1 teaspoon yeast.  After I wisked those ingredients together I added the zest from two lemons, some chopped rosemary (I didn't measure, sorry) and about 2 1/2 cups shredded Gruyere. 





Mix all the ingredients together well and add 3 cups water (remember doubled).  Stir until you have a shaggy dough.  Cover with plastic wrap and let set 12 - 18 hours. 





This is what the dough looks like after 12 hours.  Now you can do what I did earlier.  Heat the oven to 450 degrees.  After the oven has heated put the covered pot in and heat for 30 minutes....... If you can't remember the rest, scroll up and refresh your memory.

Next  flavor.





Cranberry, orange and almond.  I didn't double this batch.  In my large bowl I have 3 cups flour, 1 3/4 teaspoon of salt and 1/2 teaspoon yeast.  Add about 3/4 cup cranberries, orange zest from one orange and about 1/2 cups sliced almonds.  Mix it together well and add 1 1/2 cups water.  Stir to form and shaggy dough.



Cover with plastic wrap and let set 12 - 18 hours.  Bake as directed above.  I think this is my favorite flavor.  Loved it!

I will now show you pictures of the bread I have baked.  Just scroll through the beautiful loaves of bread. 




Two loaves I added shredded sharp cheddar.  One is plain.




Cheddar sliced.





Cranberry, orange, almond in front and the back loaf is a seeded loaf with pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds and poppy seeds.




Here are the two loaves of Rosemary, lemon and Gruyere, the cranberry, orange, almond and a plain loaf.





I really don't need 4 loaves of bread so I'm wrapping them up in a dish towel and I will deliver them to four wonderful blondes that I start my morning with everyday. 








That's a cute little gift. 

I'm now going to give you some homework.  Start creating new bread flavors.  I'll share with you the bread  my son and I have made.  Oh, just to let you know, we have been creating so much that I have gone through 75 lbs. of flour since January.  NO, I haven't eaten it all.  I give it away. 

Our bread flavors:  Pepper jack cheese, Jalapeno cheddar, Raisin walnut cinnamon, Pumpkin sunflower poppy seed, Sharp cheddar, Rosemary lemon Gruyere, Lemon thyme Asiago, Asiago, Mixed herb with rosemary, chives and thyme and plain.  Now I have to tell you that I have experimented using wheat flour.  Whole wheat was WAY too heavy.  I tried adding just 1 cup wheat flour in place of 1 cup of white...ahh it was ok, but not great.

I can't wait to hear from you.  Let me know about your fabulous creations.



Crusty Bread

3 cups unbleached all purpose flour
1 3/4 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon Instant or Rapid-rise yeast
1 1/2 cups water

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together flour, salt and yeast.  Add water and mix until a shaggy mixture forms.  Cover bowl with plastic wrap and set aside for 12 - 18 hours.  Overnight works great.  Heat oven to 450 degrees.  When the oven has reached 450 degrees place a cast iron pot with a lid in the oven and heat the pot for 30 minutes.  Meanwhile, pour dough onto a heavily floured surface and shape into a ball.  Cover with plastic wrap and let set while the pot is heating.  Remove hot pot from the oven and drop in the dough.  Cover and return to oven for 30 minutes.  After 30 minutes remove the lid and bake an additional 15 minutes.  Remove bread from oven and place on a cooling rack to cool. 

Print this recipe.

 I have created a new page for all questions that you might have regarding this recipe.  On this page you can send in your creation ideas or helpful hints.  I hope this will make it easier to receive questions to answers that you might have regarding this recipe.  Click on this link to ask any question you may have: 

http://simplysogood.blogspot.com/2012/08/crusty-no-knead-bread-forum.html


FAQ's

Q:  Do I have to use an enamel covered cast iron pan?

A:  NO.  You can use anything that can take the heat.  The following have been used that I know of:
Clay pots with lids, Pizza stone with a bowl to cover the bread, insert from a crockpot, pyrex baking dish with a lid, stainless steel pot with a lid, baking dish covered with aluminum foil, old cast iron dutch oven.


Q:  Do I have to use unbleached flour?

A:  I always use unbleached flour.  You can try bleached flour.


Q:  Can I use self rising flour?

A:  I don't know.  I would just stick to all-purpose.


Q:  What size is my pan?

A:  My smallest pan is 5.5 quart.  You can use as small as a 3 quart.


Q:  What type of yeast do I use?

A:  I use SAF instant yeast.  Any yeast should work.


Q:  Why is my bread turning out flat?

A:  I don't know.  You could try using less 1/4 cup less liquid.  Or add a bit more flour.  Make sure you dough appears to be dry when you first mix it.  It will have more moisture during the rising time.


Q:  Can my dough sit out longer than 18 hours?  Does it HAVE to be between 12-18 hours?

A:  I have let some dough sit as long as 24 hours and the bread was beautiful.


Q:  Have you tried Gluten-free?

A:  No.  I'm still waiting for someone to venture into the realm of Gluten-free. If you try it, let everyone know.


Q:  Do I have to grease or oil the pan?  Will my bread stick?

A:  No you don't need to grease the pan.  I have never had the bread stick when using a cast iron pot.  I haven't tried anything else.  The best way to be certain that the bread won't stick is to form the loaf on a sheet of parchment paper and lift the bread into the pan using the sides of the parchment.  Leave the paper in  the pan.  It's won't burn.  When the bread has baked, just lift the sides of the parchment out of the pan.  Voila!




This note added 3/15/12
:  I tried Rye bread.  It was delicious.  I tried two different recipes.  One was 1/2 rye flour and 1/2 white flour then added 1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds.  For the first time it didn't rise much.  The loaf was about 2-inches high.  Made great focaccia, however.  The second loaf was 1 cup Rye flour and 2 cups white flour, 1/2 teaspoons caraway seeds. I sprinkled caraway seeds on top.  It turned out wonderful and made some fabulous pastrami, Swiss and grilled onion panini's. 


This note added 3/14/12:  for all of you that have commented within the past few days, please scroll to the bottom of the comment page.  Notice "load more"  click on that and more comments will appear.  I have been trying to keep up with all comments.  I just want you to be able to find your comment and my answer.  If all else fails send me your email address and I'll shoot you a response.  Thank you so much for all the comments and ideas.  Love them!



 (Added 3/10/12)  Let me start by saying that you DO NOT need to oil, grease or PAM your cooking pot.  I have not had the bread stick yet.  You're going to have to trust me on that advice.  I have had many people ask what size pot I use.  In this post I am using a 5.5 quart enamel cast iron pot.  This size is perfect.  I am also using an oval pot that is about 7.5-8 quarts.  I have had comments that ceramic deep dishes work well.  Scan down through the comments to see other options for baking.


Gluten Free photo sent from Star:



Star's recipe for GF bread:  Hi, I just wanted to let you know that I love this bread so much and have made it many times with great success. Today was the first time I tried to make it gluten-free. I thought I'd share my experience for anyone who is wondering. I made absolutely no changes to the recipe. I simply used all purpose gluten-free flour (which already contains the correct amount of xanthan gum; more specifically, I use Jules Gluten Free Flour) in place of regular all purpose gluten-free flour. I made no other changes. No changes to amounts. I probably left it in the oven about 7 or so minutes longer. Very crunchy on the outside. I didn't let it brown much at all because felt it would get too hard -- it was already very crunchy. The inside was not as I would have expected. It's almost more raw-like. That's probably not the right word. It was more gooey? -- Just not as dry-like/bready....it was just different. But it tasted very good. And tasted like the crusty bread made with regular white flour. Didn't taste any different for being gluten-free. It also smelt just as good. It was smaller. In fact, I really don't think it rose. I wonder if you could just by-pass that step when you use gluten-free flour (I've heard gluten-free breads don't really rise) of having it sit overnight and just pop it in the oven right away. But it was very good and everyone loved it. And it got eaten just as fast as the regular version.

2,061 comments:

  1. If Janet can do it, anyone can do it!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Jeannette England3/24/10, 7:23 AM

    Wow! My bread is beautiful! Can't believe how easy!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Well, I made my bread--who'd've thought you could recreate a steam oven in cast iron. The bread is gorgeous. My first attempt failed, but it was a fault of a very dry batch of flour. For the second attempt, I used 2 1/2 cups water instead of 1 1/2 cups. I could probably do with 2 to 2 1/4 next time, but the dough held its shape just fine. Next up, flavors! Personally, I'm thinking roasted garlic and herbes de Provence.

    The first loaf is making vanilla bean French toast tonight... YUM. Thanks for the great recipe. This will undoubtedly be a keeper. Gorgeous stuff, Janet! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Steven Barton3/27/10, 2:05 PM

    So what are we talking about for home temperatures during the long rising stage? I've read recipes which require a long rising, but actually stipulate proofing the dough in the refrigerator! And I would think that whether the proofing takes place during the cooler night hours or during the warmer day hours would make a difference.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Steve, I have let the dough proof during the night as well as all day. No difference. Just let it sit on your counter for 12-18 hours. It just works. It seriously is amazing. Follow all of the other directions. It also rises differently depending on what additions you throw in. No matter - it just works!

    ReplyDelete
  6. I did it! I used wheat flour, but I made a few changes. I used 1/4 cup flour less and 1/2 cup more water and cooked it 5 less minutes. But it perfecct! I feel like such a cook! Thanks my husband will be so proud! -COurtney ENgland

    ReplyDelete
  7. WAY TO GO, Courtney! I'm so glad the whole grain was finally figured out. I'm on it. I'm thinking whole wheat with walnuts and raisins. I really like nuts!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hey Janet!!
    I just bought myself a couple things from Le Creuset- I found the outlet store in CT :-)

    I am making this right now and am so excited to see how it turns out!!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi Julie,
    I'm so jealous you have an outlet store for Le Creuset. You'll love the bread. I seriously went through 100 lbs. of flour trying out new breads during the winter.

    Let me know how your bread turns out and what flavors you use. I'm so excited for you!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Steven Barton9/6/10, 7:01 PM

    "Please notice how used my Le Creuset pots are. Everything is my kitchen is heavily used. If you have any advice as to how I can clean my babies, please let me know."

    You might try Bar Keeper's Friend (the liquid formula, not the powder). 'Works well on mine.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

      Delete
    2. I use bar keepers friend powder formula and I like it.

      Delete
  11. I just tried a no knead bread in my dutch oven and was so excited with how beautiful it came out. Your variations and flavors look delicious, can't wait to try them. As far as cleaning your Le Creuset, the company sells special cleaner just for their pots.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I've been looking for variations on the no-knead recipe. Thank you for not including one but two! I can't wait to give them both a try.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I am so happy I found this recipe. I have several enamel cast iron pots and also wanted to make bread.

    I do have one question. I am unsure as to when you add the additional ingredients. It seems that it is before you let it sit for the 12 hours, but then what about the cheese sitting out all night.

    I did buy Gruyere for another recipe and am not too fond of it as a cheese, but I don't mind it if it is in a recipe. I would love to use it up before it goes bad.

    I was thinking about do0ing a Gruyere, rosemary, and roasted garlic loaf.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi Mysterysinc, Yes you do add the addtional ingredients with the flour and yes it does sit out for 12 hours+. I have not had a problem doing that with the cheese. If you are uncomfortable letting it sit out, you could try to stir it in before baking. I've done that and it is more difficult to get the cheese incorporated in. The Gruyere, rosemary and roasted garlic sounds FABULOUS! Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I can't wait. I just mixed up some rosemary lemon and will bake it tomorrow. Thanks for the great pictures and recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  16. This bread is awesome! It changed my life! You can add more yeast to taste (I've been successful with up to 1 tsp.) It's so delicious you practically have to keep it under lock and key!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi Amber, you will LOVE the rosemary lemon! I'm so glad you tried it.

    Hi Amy, I'm glad I'm not the only one that has to lock up the bread. When I made the cranberry/orange/almond, I ate the entire loaf!! Hey wouldn't that be so great with left over turkey and cranberries! I'm so doing it!

    ReplyDelete
  18. IT WORKED, IT WORKED!! I needed more flour. I have made an Italian spiced one, original, cranberry, orange and nut. I'm so excited. I'm going to try a maple nut one next. now I want another pot, thanks :-)

    ReplyDelete
  19. I also tried with much success and people were impressed with the orange juice cranberry one I tried. basically I am trying different liquids other than water. the oj did bring out a slightly sourdough taste to it too. I am thinking it is because of the citric interacting with the yeast. not sure though.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thanks for the tip Julie. I think I'll try a little oj.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Janet,
    We LOVE Bacon and or Puncetta i our household.
    When making the with Rosemary would it harm the bread by adding the chopped bacon or puncetta ?

    ReplyDelete
  22. Heck no! I think the skies the limit on flavors. I'd love to hear how your bread turns out. The males in my house are bacon lovers...I just didn't even think to add it to the bread. Ooo how about bacon/cheddar???

    ReplyDelete
  23. Janet- When can we get the grilled pizza recipes and directions? I hear it was a hit with everyone!

    ReplyDelete
  24. That was so much fun. Cassidy was a riot! Seriously she was lit last night. I did use this dough to make the pizza crust. I love it be cause the crust is crip and thin. I will get you the recipes. They actually came from a CPK cookbook that I have. One Crusty bread recipe will make two pizzas. I'll get you copies.

    ReplyDelete
  25. to clean the le crueset - try a magic eraser. that's what i use on mine and it works great. love this recipe and all the variations! thanks

    ReplyDelete
  26. Thanks Amy. I didn't think of a magic eraser. I'll do it.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Hi Janet,
    I absolutely adored your blog, they are so detailed in all the step- by - step.

    I am a attempting in bread making at the moment (crossing my fingers and toes every time when it goes into the oven) :-P

    2 questions:
    - Can I still bake this bread without Le Creuset pot?
    - the recipe you provided is it for 1 or 2 portions?

    ReplyDelete
  28. Hi Janet,
    This was an awesome post- thank you for making
    my husband believe that I am truly a domestic goddess- lol!!
    Would you please share the pizza dough recipe?
    Or post a link?
    Many thanks, sheila

    ReplyDelete
  29. sorry I have not responded promptly, I have been out of town. You do not have to have a Le Creuset pot, but you do need a cast iron pot with a well fitting lid. The recipe will make one loaf of bread. Good luck. It seriously is so easy. My college son bakes this all the time. It's a no brainer. Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Oh yes, my son makes the best pizza dough. I have wanted to blog pizza's for a while. I'll get on that. However, I have used this recipe for pizza dough. It is very sticky, but I just use a lot of flour to roll it out. It makes a very crisp crust, which I love. I hope to get on the pizza blog soon.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Would magnalite cookware work too? Or does it have to be straight cast iron?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have used magnalite and it worked really well.

      Delete
  32. Hmmmm. Not sure. I've never used magnalite. You could give it a try. It just might work. As long as you have a tight fitting lid. It just might work. I know you need a heavy bottom pan or the bottom of the bread turns pretty dark.

    ReplyDelete
  33. I used a recipe similar to this in the past that called for the use of a typical stainless steel stock pot and lid... I had a BIG problem with the dough sticking to the pan. Do I need to worry about that with the Le Creuset?

    ReplyDelete
  34. I have never had problems with the bread sticking in any enamel coated dutch oven.

    ReplyDelete
  35. What size of pot are you using? 6 quart?

    ReplyDelete
  36. I have a round 5.5 quart and 2 oval 7 quart pans. 6 quart would work great. You can use as small as a 5 quart.

    ReplyDelete
  37. This bread looks absolutely beautiful! Looking forward to trying it. Can you please confirm whether you used fast-acting yeast (ie, the type for bread machines) or just normal dried yeast that you normally reactivate in water? I assume the former but wanted to check. Thanks a lot, Lauren

    ReplyDelete
  38. I always use the brand SAF instant yeast. You could use normal dried yeast as well. You will completely impressed yourself when you take this bread out of the oven. Enjoy.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Janet,
    I LOVE your site. How wonderful of you to create this for others! I "had" a recipe for Artisan bread from a group I belonged to for Cast Iron collectors. I have a Wagner Dutch oven that I am going to try this with. I wonder though, should I put a wee bit of oil on the bottom? I also have a LC, but it's SO big, oval.
    CANNOT wait to try your recipe!!!
    Thank you so much. BEAUTIFUL site!
    Nan

    ReplyDelete
  40. Hi Nan, I so glad you found my site. I really don't think you will need the oil. I'm not familiar with a Wagner Dutch oven. The bread bakes beautifully in a Lodge dutch oven without oil. Let me know how it works.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Oh man............. I'm so not happy:( I put my first batch of this easy bread into my oven and it is on it's last leg of the journey.... the last fifteen mins...... I can tell though that it's not looking good for the home team! LOL
    The loaf is looking very small and dense. What did I do? It looked GORGEOUS while "rising" nice and bubbly....... light.
    But when I went to take it out of the bowl, boy did it shrink up...... what did I do wrong?
    Oh and BTW, the Wagner Dutch Oven is a very old cast Iron Dutch Oven like the good old days, like Grandma used to cook with:):)
    Have any ideas of what I possibly did wrong?
    thanks!
    Nan

    ReplyDelete
  42. I'm so sorry Nan. Ok let's go through some of your steps. It does rise quite a bit during the 12-18 hour rising time. THEN I remove it from the bowl onto a heavily floured surface and form the dough into a ball. It DOES deflate. Cover the dough with the plastic wrap that was originally on the dough while the oven is heating. Put the dutch oven in the oven and heat for 30 minutes. Then remove the hot pan from the oven and carefully lift the dough and drop into the hot pan. Don't burn yourself. At this point my dough looks like a mess. Because it is so sticky, it just doesn't hold the same shape once dropped into the pan. Put the lid on and place in oven for 30 minutes. Remove lid cook another 15 minutes. When you remove the lid the bread should have risen. It should look beautiful. It is a more dense bread with a thick crust. ???? Let me know if this helps.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Hi Janet!
    Sorry for the long lag in my response.
    I did a little bit more reading and found that I should have been allowing my bread to rise another two hours after removing the dough from the bowl and shaping it into the ball. I did this and OMG was it delicious! My family absolutely loved it. So the key was an additional two hours on the counter before going into the hot Dutch Oven.
    YUMMY!
    nan

    ReplyDelete
  44. Hmmm...that's interesting. I'm glad it worked for you.

    ReplyDelete
  45. wonderful! I can stop myself from reading your recipes. I admires how crusty your bread look.Also I would love to have your 'le creuset pots'. I'm going to buy one, but I think the bread look kind of rough, may be because you dont knead them before baking them. Thanks anyway!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  46. Le Creuset pots are so expensive, but love them. I have purchased Martha Stewart enamel cast iron pots at a fraction of the price and they work just as well. My sister uses a "Lodge" cast iron dutch oven for camping and it works great. It is a rough exterior. The dough is extremely sticky and really isn't kneaded at all. Looks rough, but tastes fabulous. I just made a loaf filled with chunks of pepper jack cheese last night. It was fabulous. Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  47. For some reason Anonymous your comment isn't posting. I'm not sure how watery your dough is. It's pretty sticky and doesn't hold it's shape much. Every time I lift the dough to put it in the pan, I make a big mess. It's sticks to my hands and so I plop the dough in the pan and it somehow always works. Let me know if your bread turns out. Next time add 1/4 more flour and see if that helps. Good luck.

    ReplyDelete
  48. I just saw this recipe on Pinterest, so I'm a little late to comment, but I think you should be citing your sources. It seems implied that this is your brainchild, but your repeated use of the word "shaggy" is a dead giveaway. YouTube "no knead bread" and you'll find the original baker who developed the recipe as it was run years ago in The New York Times.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Oh yes!!! This looks awesome! I will definitely be making this asap!!! I love homemade bread and I have never tried it this way. I am so excited to try it...my family will devour it!

    ReplyDelete
  50. Janet, I love the beauty of this bread and am already craving a loaf! I recently baked a loaf with kalamata olives & pine nuts at a friend's house, but it took a ton of prep, a grain grinder and a dough kneader! What you've just posted is every bit as beautiful and I can tell from the comments delicious, too! I haven't broken in my new Le Creuset dutch oven, yet - my friend just got it for me on sale with a coupon at Macy's for $25 - so this is the perfect debut! :) P.S. I also admire how you respond to each comment. Few bloggers do that and it's so helpful to actually see all of the answers to questions I now won't have to ask!

    ReplyDelete
  51. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  52. First of all, Janet, I think you are the best blogger I have ever experienced. You are so thoughtful to respond to almost every comment even when it's been a repeat question! I don't have the right pan w/lid to make this delicious looking bread but I will start looking.
    P.S. it also tickles me that I've found a soul-sister who still says "holy cow". :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha. Well, I can't type what I'm really thinking. I've thought about it, but the church ladies would have a hissy fit! Thanks for such a kind comment.

      Delete
  53. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe! I tried the basic loaf last night (lasted about 10 minutes between 3 of us) and have two more going today--fig/walnut/bleu cheese and swiss/tarragon/cracked pepper. I can't wait to try some of the other suggestions!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fig! Walnut! Blue Cheese! You win!!!!!! That sounds amazing. I love anything with cracked pepper. Thanks for sharing. Let me know what eles you create.

      Delete
  54. kswinarski@nc.rr.com I am a total lover of baking breads. I have tried many many recipes and I do have to say this was the best flavored bread, and easiest bread to make. Thank you for sharing this and your other great recipes with us.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for your kind comment. That just made my day.

      Delete
  55. Oh yum, yes let us know about rye. Baked this yesterday and it is, by far, the best bread I have ever made. Will definitely be making again and again. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will work on that rye recipe. Uggh wanted to today, but had a dr. appt. Foot in a boot for 4-6 weeks...cried while eating carrot cake. I'll get on that Rye.

      Delete
  56. Found a great way to get the dough into the pot alot easier! Put the dough on parchment paper and then drop the paper with the dough right into the pot. Love this recipe, Thank you sooo much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Viola! There you have it. The best tip so far. I can't tell you how many times I have ruined a beautiful loaf by lifting it into that hot pan. thank you so much for sharing.

      Delete
  57. Incredible recipe! Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Tiffany. I have a Tiffany and she is as sweet as the name. I greatly appreciate your comment.

      Delete
  58. I have been reading some of the posts but have not seen if you grease your pans. So do you? This looks amazing!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do not grease or oil the pan. I have not had any trouble with the bread sticking.

      Delete
  59. Can't wait to try this recipe. I do have a LaCruset French oven so will be perfect. My friend has the same kind of pot that she got at Sams and it would work really well too The cost is a fraction of the laCruset. Both are enameled coated cast iron and both have a life-time warranty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Another fabulous tip. Thank you so much.

      Delete
  60. I baked my first batch today and it came out perfect so I decided to make one with some parmesan cheese. It's been rising for about 8 hourse and I noticed it has some discolored spots and flecks. I'm concerned that it could be mold. Have you ever had this happen? I had it covered tightly with plastic wrap so I don't know if that caused the problem.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ya know...that does happen when I mix in things. I really don't think that it's mold. I think it's just the flour. It is like when you put pancake batter in the refrigerator overnight and it darkens a bit??? Have you ever had that happen? I'm sorry that I don't know exactly what it is, but it does go away during baking. I haven't worried about it. I hope this helps????

      Delete
  61. Bonni Stroud3/12/12, 11:48 PM

    Tried this the other day in my cast iron Lodge dutch oven and it tasted awesome! The only thing is it rose perfectly in the covered bowl (sat on counter for about 17 or more hours)and when I took it out of the bowl and laid it on the flour it deflated. I covered it while the pot was heating and after it cooked it still didn't rise. Maybe I should've added more yeast? I did as instructed except I added sharp cheddar cheese a little garlic powder and some dried basil. You think that could've affected the rising? Even though it didn't rise it still tasted great. Any tips would be greatly appreciated! Thanks for sharing such an easy and delicious recipe!

    ~Bonni

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have not had that problem. Be careful not to work the dough too much after removing from the bowl. I just gently scrape it out of the bowl onto a flour surface and gently form into...something that resembles bread. Don't knead or work the dough after the rising time. I hope this helps.

      Delete
  62. I've used a similar recipe for years, that can store in the frig for up to a week. THIS one sounds great.. I'll be trying it really soon as I love a good Bread. Love the various flavorings folks are using. Cast iron is good for everything!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm anxious to hear how you like this. Thanks for your comment.

      Delete
  63. My plain version is sitting on the counter as I type this! Can't wait to bake it and taste it tomorrow! One question: how do you know how much extra ingredients to add for different varieties? I want to try a cinnamon raisin but I don't know how much to add! Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh geez, I just guessed. I usually add about 1 cup cheese when I use it. With raisins about 1/2 cup. Depends on how much you want studded into you bread. I probably added 1 tsp. cinnamon. You can just play around with the ingredients. The dough may look loaded when you first mix it, but as it rises and bakes the add-ins spread out.

      Delete
  64. Yummmm. I love this. Today's batch, cranberries, orange zest and sunflower seeds.

    ReplyDelete
  65. I don't have a cast iron pot. Would my Pampered Chef Stone roasting pan would work? Has anyone tried that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Does it have a lid? You just need a tight fitting lid. The pot becomes a steam oven. The steam creates the crisp crust. If it has a lid, I'd try it. Why not? Let me know if it works.

      Delete
  66. Two attempts now it's just not rising. It's yummy, but very dense. Any suggestions as to why? I am in Colorado at about 4,700 feet, so maybe I should change something to adjust for the high altitude? :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My altitude is about 5500 feet. What about your yeast? Is is new. You can check in by mixing it with some water and letting it stand for about 10 minutes. If it foams that means its still alive and kicking. If it doesn't you may need more yeast. Also, try being very gentle with the dough while taking it out of the bowl. Don't knead or fuss with it. It is a heavy dense bread. It's not light and fluffy. I hope this helps.

      Delete
  67. i found this recipe on pinterest. i made it in my pampered chef's deep covered stoneware baker. it turned out perfect! gonna start another loaf tonight!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fabulous information. Thank you for sharing.

      Delete
  68. Made my first loaf yesterday!! Awesome, awesome, awesome! Can't wait to try variations!

    ReplyDelete
  69. I mistakenly used bleached flour and I think that did make a small difference in overall quality (slightly gummy center, instead of a chewy crumb), and the crust was super crusty - difficult to slice - I'll wait until it cools more next time - but otherwise this is the best bread recipe I've ever tried!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's good to know. I don't ever purchased bleach flour, but there might be some followers that will need that information. Thank you so much for sharing. Let me know if start creating flavors.

      Delete
  70. I'm excited to make this! I do have a suggestion for your pots and how to clean them. Have you heard of Norwex? If not - YOU NEED TO! Their cleaning paste would work wonders on your pot - inside and out of it. I have used it on my sterling silver pots I thought were 'burned' on the bottom forever - and it make it like new! Seriously try it. I have a friend who sells it and if needed, she can order you some and ship it to your door - wherever you are.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have not heard of Norwex. I'll read up on it. What product did you use?

      Delete
  71. Wow I too found the recipe on pinterest and it was exactly as you said....perfect....mine just came out of the oven.
    Just like your picture ....and yummy.... Can't wait to make it again with some additions ....
    Thank you so much for the recipe! I will be buying a pan for my daughter that is getting married in June so that she too can make some bread .... I did have the exact pan ...well I have 2 and will be ale to double my recipes and really look forward to having fun with this recipe now.... So easy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wahoo. I'm so glad your bread was a success. My college students have pans to bake bread in. My son has become quite the bread baker...but he still doesn't have wife???

      Delete
  72. I have that exact blue pot. I am totally going to try this!!

    ReplyDelete
  73. I don't have any thing that is cast iron. Would the Pampered Chef Stoneware: Deep Covered Baker work?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it does work. Read up on a few comments. As long as it has a lid, give it a try.

      Delete
  74. A small bowl filled with 1/2 cup of ammonia and placed on the bottom of your oven with Le Creuset in the oven and the oven door closed overnight will also clean your pans up. And your ovens too!

    Can't wait to try this bread. My cast iron dutch oven isn't enamel coated so we'll see how it works! Have you tried with whole wheat flour yet?

    ReplyDelete
  75. I put together 4 breads. They ended up having 20-22 hr sitting time before I got them in. I used orange juice in one and the wheat almost 1/2 and 1/2. Taste wise they were all great. I was disappointed that they didn't raise up as high as my previous try (more flat and no peak in the middle).

    Do you think it might be because they sat for so long?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think so. It could be the mixture of a heavier flour or the orange juice. You just have to play with it and see what works best. Sometimes my bread doesn't rise as much either. I don't stress over it.

      Delete
  76. omg, just ate the best bread! soak 1/3 cup of 10 grain cereal in h20 (about 3/4 cps water) for a couple hours. Mix 2 cps sprouted wheat flour, 1 cp white unbleached flour, and the rest of the regular bread recipe above. When adding the water, add the cereal at the same tine, with 1/4 cp molasses. Might not need as much water since the water in the grain cereal adds moisture. Follow as usual. WOW, this is so good my husband and I are chowing as we speak! Enjoy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now that's what I like to see. Creativity in the kitchen. Way to be daring. This mixture looks amazing. I'll give it a shot. Thanks for sharing the recipe. Happy baking.

      Delete
  77. Wow...holy cow. I love to cook and this was so easy and beautiful I can't wait to use my own 100lbs of flour!! I used my le crueset 5.5 and I had a round covered casserole dish..rachel ray..from Kohl's...not cast iron. The rachel ray turned out better than the other (I'm really glad since I use it for nothing and my le crueset for EVERYTHING. Thanks again...best post ever!

    ReplyDelete
  78. Looks wonderful!! Can't wait to try it!! Do you grease the pan?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nope. I don't grease the pan. Bread does not stick...so far.

      Delete
  79. I made the dough yesterday and it didn't seem as moist as you mentioned. Having baked bread other ways in the past, the dough I ended up with was the right amount of stickiness just to throw in the oven right then. When I dumped it out this morning to bake, it was a little bit more sticky but definitely not bad at all. I live at about 5,000 ft. Should I be adding more water?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm above 5,000 and I don't add more water. The dough is pretty stiff and first and does seem wetter as it sits. I'm not super accurate at measuring all of the time. Some days the dough is stiffer than other days. Some days my bread rises higher than other days. I'm ok with that. I try to take baking pretty easy and let what happens happen. C'est la vie.

      Delete
  80. I had a question. I have trouble forming mine into a ball. It just wants to spread out until it's an inch high disk on the cutting board, waiting in the flour for the pan to heat up. I let it rise for 18 hours. Is it too much water? I used all the correct amounts and don't live at a high altitude. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had that happen today while trying to make Rye bread. Less water for sure. Start with 1/4 cup less water. See what happens then.

      Delete
  81. Hi! I baked my bread today & it looks AMAZING! I put cheddar cheese & garlic in it. However, I cut a small slice & it appears a bit doughy. :0( I put it back in for 8 minutes, covered, I hope that will help. Have you ever had this happen to yours?

    The only difference from your recipe is that I have a cast aluminum pan vs. cast iron. I did some research online & it appears that shouldn't make a difference, but could that be the culprit?

    I appreciate any suggestions! Thanks!
    Tammi

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ???Hmmmm. Well, the bread texture is denser than normal bread. It could be that it was just cut while too hot, but we generally cut into the bread as soon as it is out of the pan. You could try baking it longer. However you don't want the crust to be too dark or hard. Let me know what happens from baking it longer.

      Delete
    2. I may have figured out the problem with mine...I used your cheese measurement of 2 1/2 cups, but spaced that you were making a double batch! I only made a regular batch. Hmmm...extra cheesy bread I guess! LOL

      Delete
    3. My son would be in cheese heaven!

      Delete
  82. These all look AMAZING! Love the gift idea too! Going to start a batch tonight, THANK YOU FOR SHARING!

    ReplyDelete
  83. Just made my first batch and it is bread heaven!!! i have tried to make bread so many times and have failed. will this work in roll form as well if so what do you think the baking time would be?
    thanks so much for sharing this.

    ReplyDelete
  84. Hi! I can't believe how easy & good this was! I thought for sure it wouldn't work....I mean, no kneading? no spraying the pan? But I did what you said and have a lovely loaf that I love! I can't wait to try some variations, but I'm horrible at not having a recipe. When you add other ingredients, how do you know how much of each additional items to add? Thx so much! :)

    ReplyDelete
  85. I can't wait to try this out!! I was wondering though if anyone has mentioned making this into a gluten free recipe and IF it has still worked?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have not tried gluten free. I was thinking about playing around with spelt and kamut since they have lower amounts of gluten. They would make the bread heavier than wheat, however.Let me know if you try it. My body handles gluten just fine...in fact it loves it. So I don't have to play around with gluten-free.

      Delete
  86. Not sure what Im doing wrong. Im getting discouraged since everyone else seems to be getting it right. Im on my 3rd batch and the dough is doubling in size, but when I bake it in the enamel cast iron pot its flat like a pancake. Any suggestions??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Where do you live? I'm coming over! I just want to see what is going on in your kitchen. Read down a few comments and see what I have said about instant yeast vs. normal yeast. Try that. I actually had this problem yesterday while playing around with rye flour. I had a loaf do the exact same thing that you described. I make two loaves one with 1/2 rye flour & 1/2 white. The other loaf was 1/3 rye flour and 2/3 white flour. The 1/2 & 1/2 was flat as a pancake, but had a stronger rye flavor. I like the flat loaf, I just sliced it in half length wise and pretended it was foccacia. Let's keep in touch about your bread. You will succeed!

      Delete
  87. I had to buy an enamel cast iron dutch oven cuz I didn't have one, but it was worth it because last night I made my first loaf, baked it this morning and ate it for breakfast! It looked exactly like yours. I'm thrilled. I had lots of flour on the bottom of mine which made it kind of thick, so I thought I might try just a dusting of cornmeal on the bottom. Have you tried that? I want to use raisins and cinnamon in a loaf for tomorrow. This was SO easy and it's so pretty and was so fast. My dutch oven said not to put it cold, into a hot oven, so I just popped it in the cold oven and turned it on to 450 and it worked just fine. Thanks so much for the inspiration!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have not tried cornmeal, but what the heck. Give it a try. I did however try the suggestion of placing the dough onto parchment then dropping it into the hot pan. Worked like a charm. I think I'll do that from now on. I like the crunch the cornmeal could give. Cornmeal tastes much better that flour. Thanks for your comment and helpful tip on pan heating.

      Delete
  88. Ooops. Mine didn't rise much. Guess I was supposed to activate the yeast in water first instea of just mixing the pellets in?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You could have something there on the yeast. I only use instant. Try activating the yeast in a 1/4 cup warm water. Then add to the mixture. You will need to reduce the water that you put in, of course. I just wish I could just pop on over to your kitchen to see what's up. Let me know if the yeast thing works.

      Delete
  89. After a full 12 hours in the bowl after sitting all night it definitely looked like yours,however, when I removed it from the bowl the dough was still quite gooey and didn't really form a ball. After placing it on the floured surface it flattened out quite a bit (about 8 inches in diameter and 1.5 inches high) Did I do something wrong?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you using white unbleached flour? I think the whole grains do something funky to the dough. Let's start with the yeast. Are you using instant. That's all I use these days. If you are using regular yeast (not instant,) try dissolving it in 1/4 cup warm water. When it begins to foam mix into the flour and other ingredients. You could try making a stiffer dough. Reduce the water by 2 tablespoons for a start. ???

      Delete
  90. I agree with the comment above about you being the best blog hostess. My loaf looked like a brain going into the pot. Did I not shape it long enough I was so scared to over work it. Mine just didn't look as tight as yours. Also, could you use beer instead of yeast and water?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why thank you for such a great compliment. I'll consider myself the hostess with the mostess :) I just wish I could come into everyone's kitchen that is having problems with rising. Maybe make a stiffer dough...less water??? About the beer...not sure on that. I've only used beer to kill slugs in my garden. But hey, it's worth a try. Let me know if you try it. I'd love to hear the results.

      Delete
  91. I've been making the bread from the book "Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day" for a while, it's basically the same thing, and learned that if you have a baking stone, you can use that with a large metal bowl to cover, and it does the same thing. I'm not one lucky enough to have any great cast iron (enamel or otherwise) but this works for me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I really need to get that book. I think it's a great idea to use a pizza stone. Thanks for the great tip.

      Delete
  92. omg its the best

    ReplyDelete
  93. Try scrubbing your pot with a little Cameo, it should take the crud right off. I'm so making this bread, by the way...

    ReplyDelete
  94. Hi all.
    in reading through all the positive comments I hope I am not repeating the question.
    I am wondering if anyone has tried using rice flour? I havew a glutton intolerant in the house and need a great bread recipe.
    I am going to try it but was hoping someone already had.

    ReplyDelete
  95. Well, just a report to let you know how it turned out in my enamel pot.
    When I took off the lid after it was hot I had the (lovely) odour of chilli - forgotten that I had cooked that the last time I used it! Anyway, it didn't seem to matter, the bread turned out perfectly! I used parchment paper but probably won't do that again as I found it awkward to get into the pot. But the bread - SOOOOO delicious and will be repeated very soon! Even my DH is eating it, and he rarely eats any of the bread I make!

    ReplyDelete
  96. Well I am a major procrastinator at times.... So after dough proofed for 20 hrs, I figured out I dd not have the right cooking container... Living n a very small town I went to 2 second hand stores and the pharmacy... No cast iron Dutch oven. Decided to use an old Corning clear brown glass Dutch oven container. Tuned out beautiful and YUMMY! Now my sweet husband has bought me a new bright red porcelain cast iron Dutch oven.... Think he has an ulterior motive..... He loved it too. Thanks for making me look good! LOL

    ReplyDelete
  97. Question. Does everyone here eat the whole loaf at one sitting? You say that wrapping in plastic wrap makes the crust soggy. So, what is the best way to save/store some leftovers without losing the crustiness?
    Jim

    ReplyDelete
  98. I clean my Le Creuset pans with a kind of paste made of dish washing liquid and kosher salt. It scrubs all the accumulation off, but takes a fair amount of work to do it. Best of luck & thanks for sharing this recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  99. I just purchased a porcelain enamel cast iron pot in blue. Beautiful! It is just like the LeCreuset pot and is my new favorite toy! This bread recipe has inspired me to experiment and become the bread baker of the universe! You are so awesome! Cindi

    ReplyDelete
  100. Thank you for all your kind comments and helpful suggestions. You are all such fabulous bakers! Keep it up.

    ReplyDelete
  101. Hi, Janet - I found this a couple of weeks ago during a mindless Facebook/Pinterest browse and have been making a loaf of bread almost every day since! I've tried plain; dried apricot, almond and seeds; mixed grain/seed; rosemary and lemon (next time I'll add the gruyere); and kalamata olive and rosemary. The latter was the hero of my weekend camping trip in the Aussie bush, where it was devoured with a hard goats' cheese and washed down with chardonnay, between many exclamations of delight. Just one of those food perfection moments. I was fit to burst with pride. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  102. I have been using a similar recipe but have been substituting some of the water for 1/4 cup pale ale and 1 TBS white vinegar. It gives it a sour dough flavor. I also place it on a sheet of Pam-sprayed parchment paper then plop it in the Dutch oven. Yummy!

    ReplyDelete
  103. I just received my dutch oven and in the directions for use, it says NOT to preheat the dutch oven empty. I really want to bake this bread.......can anyone tell me if preheating the dutch oven empty will damage it? I can't imagine giving directions to preheat if it will cause damage. Help please....

    ReplyDelete
  104. Try cleaning your pans with Bon Ami..never scratches. Use with a damp cloth that you don't care about. Works wonder on glass pie plates, too.

    ReplyDelete
  105. Janet,

    Love the ideas, thanks so much. I tried pepperjack cheese with roasted garlic and rosemary and it was fabulous. Now, I want to try some of your other ideas. Tried a multi-grain/seed variation with sunflower seeds, flax seed, oatmeal and raisins. It made a very dense loaf that didn't raise as much but was still really delicious.
    Also, can confirm that an enamel casserole dish with lid works fine and bread comes right out with no oil. Have also tried my crock pot liner and that works great for a larger option but be sure the handle is metal. I had to replace my original knob to be able to use it in the oven.

    ReplyDelete
  106. Ok I've been trying bread/bisquits for years and no luck. I am now a SUPER HERO!!! YEAH!! I did find I had to add abut 1/2 more water to get all the flour. I also turned my oven down to 425 deg as the middle still seemed slightly wet while the outside was ready. Worked perfectly. THANK YOU!!! Bisquit recipe per chance?? hehe

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Funny you should ask about a biscuit recipe. I have that on my list of things to blog. I'm going to finish a few more "healthier" recipes then move on to biscuits and fresh strawberry jam.

      Delete
  107. I'm 2 hours into making this bread and have 2 questions. First can I split this and make one small loaf and one pizza crust? Second can I let the dough rise longer than 18 hours. I started this bread this afternoon and would
    Like to make pizza with it tomorrow but not at 6 in the morning. Could I possibly refrigerate it to use later in the evening? Thanks for this wonderful post.

    Melanie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely. You will want to adjust the cooking time for a smaller loaf. Just keep watching it. You can let the dough sit out for over 24 hours. I have without any problems. You don't need to worry about refrigerating the dough. It should work just great. Sorry I haven't responded sooner I have been out of town and away from a computer.

      Delete
  108. now that I have secured 2 pots for myself I with share something. Yes the french pots are expensive, and I was prepared to shell out some dosh to achieve what you did and shared. However, I found out that Kirkland, yes the Costco brand, sells these pots, and BTW they are made in France, even can use the same replace lip cap. Kirkland used to sell something similar, but it was made in China. They stopped selling that item and now it's from France, and the price, via Amazon, a nice jaw dropper http://www.amazon.com/Enameled-Cast-Iron-Quart-French/dp/B004YWKZQO/ref=pd_sim_sbs_misc_1 So I have included the link just in case anyone is interested in a better price but for something that is either Le C, under the Kirkland name. Can't wait to get mine and experiment with your recipe. Thanks

    ReplyDelete
  109. So, I first want to thank you for sharing. But I also want to share something. http://www.amazon.com/Enameled-Cast-Iron-Quart-French/dp/B004YWKZQO/ref=pd_sim_sbs_misc_1

    Kirkland is selling what I think are Le C pots under their brand, these are made in France. Yes Kirkland used to sell other ones but because they were made in China, folk wouldn't buy them. So their enameled pots now come from France, and the price is really really good. I bought two, and can't wait to experiment with your recipe. Thank you again.

    ReplyDelete
  110. Le Creuset 12-Ounce Enameled Cast-Iron Cleaner
    3.6 out of 5 stars (40)
    $14.95
    http://www.amazon.com/Le-Creuset-12-Ounce-Enameled-Cast-Iron/dp/B000E5D04E/ref=pd_sim_k_4

    ReplyDelete
  111. I do not have a Le Creuset pot, what else can this be made in? It looks soo good and I would really love to try your recipe. TY. eragon1060@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  112. Baked this first thing this morning...........it is the most delicious bread in the whole world. And the easiest. Thanks so much for the recipe. I'll be making this over and over and over again.

    ReplyDelete
  113. I found a 6 quart dutch oven, made by Lodge, on Amazon for $50. It showed up yesterday and I immediately went to the store for supplies!! My Asiago / Sundried Tomato bread is proofing now!! CAN'T WAIT to slice into it tomorrow!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  114. WOW...I can't thank you enough for this post....This bread is the best thing ever and crazy easy... I can't believe I made such and amazing loaf of bread!! I added thyme, chili pepper, olive oil and white pepper, some dijon mustard on top and parmesan (lovely crust)... it's smells like a bakery in my own house!!

    ReplyDelete
  115. Janet, I started making this a few years ago, per the New York Times recipe. I use my crock pot liner with the all-glass lid it comes with. It works perfectly!

    I absolutely love all the variation you have come up with...I've got to try them!

    ReplyDelete
  116. Fantastic Bread. I've been reading through the posts (as I didn't want to ask a question that has been asked a million times) and wondered if the bread is supposed to be a bit moist in the center? I know its supposed to be a bit denser but it is slightly moist and I wondered if I need to adjust my cooking times. THanks will still eat it anyways.yum

    ReplyDelete
  117. could you add dry ranch dressing seasoning or would that harm the action of the yeast? thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  118. Janet, you have the patience of a Saint!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. :) I'm going to show this comment to my family. Thanks for comfirming! Hahaha

      Delete
  119. Can't wait to try this bread..But I have to..I need one of those pans..saving my pennies..LOL.. Have you tried easy off oven cleaner...they make it safer now, I can use it on my enamel stove...but not on painted areas..

    ReplyDelete
  120. What type of yeast are you using? Is it the rapid yeast or just regular?

    ReplyDelete
  121. I've now made more than a dozen loaves of this bread, in amazing combinations! One thing I discovered is you can use up all your old herbs when then are expired (2 tsps. per loaf). No need to throw them out when replacing with new fresher bottles. Also, I used bread flour for the first time today and I found it to be lovely as well as the all-purpose flour. Seems you can't go wrong experimenting with this awesome bread!

    ReplyDelete
  122. Your breads look amazing. I tried another recipe in my cast iron pot and they had you put your dough on a piece of parchment paper and to put a cookie sheet under the pot so the bottom didn't burn. Have you ever had any trouble with the bottom turning too brown or burning? Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  123. Thank you Janet, can't wait to try the bread. I have a clay La Cloche I use to make sourdough bread, I believe that will work just as well as a Le Creuset.

    ReplyDelete
  124. OMG.. this looks amazing... sooo glad I found this on Pinterest; I'm German and miss my delicious bread here in the US and can't wait to give this one a try... I noticed that you used a spoon to mix it all up, would it work with a Kitchen-aid mixer as well or would that maybe be too much beating? Thanks for the amazing post...

    ReplyDelete
  125. does it have to be a cast iron pot?

    ReplyDelete
  126. Try putting your dutch oven in a large ziplock bag with 1/4 cup amonia and let it sit for 12-24 hours, the grime should just wipe away with minimal effort. I used this on my stove top grates and on my bbq grill grates that are enamel coated cast iron and it worked wonderfully. The fumes from the amonia break down the bond of the baked on grease.

    ReplyDelete
  127. So...I stumbled upon this through pinterest (my recent addiction in recipes) and thought "hmm...I like crusty breads, and I like easy baking....I'll try it." I honestly didn't think it would be that easy! I've only made bread once in my life...when I was 6...with my grandmother haha, so being 22 now I'm sitting there thinking "this cannot be this easy surely." But it was! I thank you for your wonderful recipe, I'm eating it right now and thinking of something else to add to the next batch. You're awesome :)

    ReplyDelete
  128. This recipe is fabulous! My friends and I have been making this for a while now (found it as no knead bread on YouTube). The only thing we do differently is that we cook it in stoneware with a stoneware lid/dome. Steams the bread the same. We still preheat it, and still cook it on 450. The stoneware works great too!

    ReplyDelete
  129. Can you use the ceramic bowl thats in in your crock pot for baking the bread?

    ReplyDelete
  130. Has anyone ever tried this recipe with gluten free flour??

    ReplyDelete
  131. I suppose I could halve the recipe to fit in my 3 3/4 qt. Le Creuset multi-function pan? Or make a full recipe and bake two loaves from it...? How would the time/temp vary? I've baked other no-knead breads - including ones that you can keep dough in the fridge for up to two weeks before you bake it! Excited to try a new one!

    ReplyDelete
  132. Janet, you are a homemade bread rockstar. I cannot wait to try this - Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  133. Pinterest strikes again!!! This looks amazing! I have read through the comments and apologize if this question has already been asked: has anyone tried using different gluten-free flours? Does anyone have any advice as to how to make this recipe gluten free? I am gluten intolerant as is my daughter and we would LOVE to find some amazing recipes for gluten free breads etc... that we can make at home and won't cost a second mortgage to eat! Thanks so much!

    ReplyDelete
  134. Wow, this bread recipe is incredible and so so easy. I have never before been able to make such amazing homemade bread. I made mine with spelt flour and it worked perfectly. Thanks Janet!! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  135. Any idea how this would work with gluten free flour? I think I am going to try it with an all purpose gluten free flour blend and see how it works out. This looks so awesome. I can't wait to try it both with gluten free flour and regular flour. I love bread!!

    ReplyDelete
  136. Thank You, Thank You, THANK YOU!!!!!! I recently moved from the west coast, were this type of bread if found everywhere and oh so yummy, to Florida, where I have had a very difficult time finding a bread with this texture, quality and crust! It was so easy to make, your pictures and easy flowing commentary was extremely encouraging. I have made this recipe twice now and the second loaf is better than the first, I can hardly wait to try the add-in's! Thank You SOOOOO Much for sharing this amazing and fulfilling gift of gourmet bread :)

    ReplyDelete
  137. Janet, you have inspired me and this morning pulled 2 wonderful loaves (the same 2 flavors you featured)out of my oven and I am now obsessed. Wanted your thoughts on using olive oil in the loaf, would I need to make any adjustments for flavoring with olive oil? Thinking of using sundried tomatoes and garlic with olive oil. Thank you thank you thank you!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  138. I made this bread today and it smells and looks amazing!!!! Mine was not as "big" so I'm hoping it still tastes the same. :) I was wondering if you could use self rising flour in combo with the yeast and get the same effect? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  139. Thanks for the awesome recipe...I made a loaf and it wasn't very "big" so I'm hoping it turns out ok. I was wondering if you could use self rising flour with the yeast for this bread or would it totally screw it up? :) Thanks for the help.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hmmm. Self rising flour has baking powder in it. I'm not sure because I don't use self rising flour. This recipe seems to be pretty resilient, so you could give it a try. ???

      Delete
  140. wondering if my non-enameled cast iron will work for this bread.

    ReplyDelete
  141. Wow! So many fun comments and so many questions. I hope to answer them all.

    - Not sure about olive oil. It could turn out beautifully. I just dip my bread in the oil as I eat. let us know if you try it.

    -I have not tried Gluten-free. I keep hoping someone does and pass on the results.

    -If making a smaller loaf, I would keep the temp. the same and just adjust cooking time. Take the lid off and 20 minutes then just keep checking. Once the bread is nice and golden brown remove it from the oven.

    - Yes you can use a ceramic crock pot insert or ceramic dish with a lid.

    - Yes, I have had problems with the bread browning too much on the bottom. I will try putting the pot on a cookie sheet. Great advice. Thank you.

    I just love all of your suggestions and advice and flavor combo's. You're awesome!

    ReplyDelete
  142. When mixing the flour water together how long do you stir by hand. I am not sure what shaggy means.

    ReplyDelete
  143. I am heart-broken. I went to make this recipe for a friend since she has just had knee surgery. I have a Lodge Logic enamel covered cast iron pot. I followed your directions, but what I didn't do was look up Lodge Lodgic's directions for use of their cookware. I ruined my pot while making this recipe. The enamel covering chipped off. The pot wasn't inexpensive, but I warn your readers that you must need a quite expensive pot to make this recipe. Wondering if I didn't heat up the pot empty, if the recipe would still work? That is what ruined my pot. Sigh.

    ReplyDelete
  144. I didn't have the pan you used, or anything like it. I just heated water to boiling and put it in a pan on the bottom of my oven and baked the bread on a pizza stone. It turned out better than I thought it would (super crusty/crunchy exterior)......and looks like something you can buy at Panera.
    Thanks for the recipe!

    ReplyDelete
  145. Let's hear it for the Holy Cow Club!!! My oven is heating and my teenaged son is sitting here waiting for the bread. Forget the breadmaker...this is so easy! I hope it works in my Pyrex baker (and that it's large enough; forgot to check what size it was and it's in the oven).

    ReplyDelete
  146. i don't have a cast iron pot nor am i going to spend any money to buy one! what can i use instead of the cast iron?

    ReplyDelete
  147. Let's hear it for the Holy Cow Club! My kids laugh at me 'cause I say that all the time. Hey, that way if they mimic me, at least they're not swearing for real! My first no-knead loaf is almost ready to finish uncovered, and it looks awesome. It barely fit in my largest Pyrex baker. I didn't feel like scrubbing my husband's rusty cast-iron camping gear, and I never thought I'd need one. I will be looking out for a baker now, for sure; maybe I'll find two, so my daughter can try this at her house. Forget the breadmaker...this is cheap and easy, my two favorite things to eat!

    ReplyDelete
  148. - I'm so sorry to hear about the lodge enamel pot. Now we know NOT to use that brand. I purchased one of Martha Stewart's enameled coated pots from Macey's and it works beautifully. No one wants to loose a pan.

    - I'm happy to hear that a pizza stone and water work. NO YOU DO NOT NEED AN EXPENSIVE POT! LOOKS LIKE ANYTHING WILL WORK.

    - just mix the dough until no dry flour is showing. Not long. that's why it's a no-knead bread.

    - Congrats to the Holy Cow club. Can't wait to hear how the bread bakes in your pyrex.

    ReplyDelete
  149. I was praying this bread would taste awful. It doesn't. Damn it. Now I'm going to gain 10 lb. Not happy.
    But seriously, amazingly easy, DELICIOUS bread! My 8 year old son said he's going to bake 50 loaves a day and sell them! A seal of approval from an 8 year old says a lot!

    ReplyDelete
  150. I just purchased a Lodge 6 quart Porcelain Enamel On Cast Iron today to make your crusty bread, but the instructions that came with the pot said not to heat it in the oven empty. Any thoughts? Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  151. Regarding cleaning your pots. Get the XXXL size ziplock storage bags. Put the whole pot in the bag with 1 cup of ammonia. Seal the bag and let it sit for about 36-48 hours. The grime will rinse right off. You only need 1 cup of ammonia because it's the fumes that eat the mess, not the liquid. I did this to clean my really gross Jenn-Air stove grates and they are now shiny and new!

    ReplyDelete